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Category: Emotional Distress (Page 1 of 2)

25 Signs Your Family Do Not Care

25 Signs Your Family Do Not Care

Family is often considered the cornerstone of support and love in our lives. It’s where we turn to in times of need, seeking comfort, understanding, and care. However, not all families live up to this ideal. There are situations where individuals find themselves in families that do not provide the love and care they deserve.

However, in some cases, individuals find themselves facing a disheartening reality: their family may not seem to care about them. While this can be emotionally challenging, it’s essential to understand that there can be various reasons behind this apparent lack of care. In this article, we’ll explore some of the common factors that might explain why your family may not seem as invested in your well-being as you’d hope.

  1. Communication Breakdown: One of the primary reasons behind a family’s seeming lack of care is a breakdown in communication. Effective communication is the bedrock of any healthy relationship, and when it falters, misunderstandings and feelings of indifference can arise. Lack of open dialogue, or poor listening skills can lead to a sense that your family doesn’t care, even when they may genuinely want to be supportive. One of the most apparent signs is a lack of communication. If your family members rarely engage in meaningful conversations with you, it can be a sign that they don’t care about your thoughts and feelings. If they are more interested in another member of the family and completely disregard your health or your goals and never ask how you are doing this means they have no interest in you or your aspirations. When an individual flaunts their wealth with little regard for another family member who may not have the financial stability to do the same, it reflects a lack of empathy and sensitivity within the family dynamic. Such behavior can create feelings of inadequacy and resentment, deepening the divide between family members. It’s important for family members to support one another and prioritize empathy and understanding, rather than exacerbating disparities in financial status. True familial bonds are built on compassion, cooperation, and the recognition that everyone’s circumstances are unique, warranting a more considerate approach to wealth and privilege.
  2. Personal Struggles: Sometimes, family members have their own personal struggles that can preoccupy them. These could include financial problems, health issues, or emotional challenges. When they are dealing with their own difficulties, such as grief, depression, anxiety, and stress, they may not have the emotional capacity or energy to fully support you, leading to the perception that they don’t care.
  3. Different Priorities: Families are made up of diverse individuals with varying priorities and interests. What is important to you might not align with what is essential to other family members. For instance, if you prioritize a creative career while your family values financial stability, they may not seem to care about your pursuits. Understanding these differences in priorities can help bridge the gap in perceptions.
  4. Emotional Distance: Sometimes, emotional distance can develop between family members due to past conflicts, unresolved issues, or growing apart. This emotional gap can lead to a sense of indifference. Family dynamics can change over time, and it’s essential to work on mending relationships when needed. When your family members actively avoid spending time with you or isolate themselves from you, it can be a heartbreaking sign that they do not care about your presence in their lives.
  5. Unresolved Issues: Unresolved issues from the past can linger and create a barrier to a caring relationship within the family. These issues might include unresolved conflicts, resentments, or deep-seated disagreements. Addressing these issues through open and honest conversations can help rebuild the bonds of care within the family. If they threaten legal action, in your pursuits to make your life better, this should raise a red flag.
  6. Different Love Languages: People express love and care in different ways, often referred to as “love languages.” While some individuals show love through acts of service or words of affirmation, others may express it through quality time or physical touch. If your family members have different love languages than you, it can lead to a misperception that they don’t care, even if they do love you deeply in their own way.
  7. Cultural and Generational Differences: Cultural and generational differences can also play a significant role in how family members express care and concern. What may be considered a sign of affection in one culture might not hold the same meaning in another. Similarly, older generations might have different values and ways of showing love compared to younger ones.
  8. Ignoring your achievements: When your accomplishments go unnoticed or are met with indifference by your family, it can be disheartening. A caring family should celebrate your successes, big or small. When you are a small business that relies on spreading brand awareness and you have sent multiple invites to, like, and share your posts and pages and you get nothing, this means they do not value you or your business.
  9. Neglecting your needs: If your basic needs for food, shelter, or emotional support are consistently overlooked or dismissed, it’s a strong indicator that your family is not prioritizing your well-being.
  10. No emotional support: A lack of emotional support during difficult times can make you feel isolated and unloved. Your family should be there to provide comfort and understanding during challenging moments. If you have reached out to them and they promised they would respond but never have, this could mean they find it difficult and would rather avoid rather than help.
  11. Constant criticism: Families should offer constructive feedback and encouragement, not constant criticism and judgment. If your family is overly critical, it can erode your self-esteem.
  12. They are dismissive: If your family dismisses your concerns, opinions, or emotions without a second thought, it’s a clear sign that they are not valuing your perspective.
  13. Motivation and Empowerment: If your family does not show interest in what you do and does not support, motivate, or empower you, this means they simply do not want you to succeed. There could be a range of reasons why, but one of them could be jealousy.
  14. You’re the black sheep: Being constantly singled out or ostracized within your family is a strong sign of a lack of care. In a loving family, everyone should feel included and accepted.
  15. No interest in your life: If your family shows no genuine interest in your hobbies, passions, or life events, it can be hurtful and isolating.
  16. Inconsistent support: Your family should be consistently supportive, but if they only show care when it’s convenient for them or when they need something, it’s a red flag.
  17. Lack of boundaries: A family that doesn’t respect your personal boundaries may not be genuinely concerned about your comfort and well-being.
    Dealing with family members who expect you to drop everything without regard for your existing commitments or business responsibilities can be incredibly challenging. Such expectations can strain relationships and disrupt your life, often without consideration for the consequences of abandoning your obligations. It’s essential to communicate your boundaries and priorities clearly, balancing your love and support for your family with the need to maintain your own responsibilities and well-being.
  18. They gaslight you: Gaslighting involves manipulating someone into questioning their reality. If your family frequently employs this tactic, it can indicate a lack of empathy and care.
  19. Neglecting your health: Your family should be concerned about your physical and mental health but should keep a safe space and respect boundaries. Neglecting your well-being is a clear sign of indifference. However, this can also be a double-edged sword, where your family may criticize you for your non-existent exercise or eating habits. Whilst they may mean well they can come across as know-it-alls and be condescending.
  20. Lack of Understanding: When your family demonstrates a lack of understanding regarding your health disabilities, life choices, and business endeavors, it can be disheartening and isolating. It’s essential to remember that everyone’s journey is unique, and empathy and support from loved ones are crucial. Open and honest communication can help bridge the gap, fostering a more compassionate environment where your choices and challenges are acknowledged and respected. Your health, choices, and business aspirations deserve recognition and understanding, just like anyone else’s, as you navigate your own path in life.
  21. They exclude you: If your family consistently excludes you from important family events or gatherings, it can be a sign that they don’t want you to be a part of their lives. Exclusion from family events can stem from various reasons, often tied to interpersonal conflicts, misunderstandings, or differences in values and beliefs. It might be due to unresolved disputes, jealousy, or even a desire to protect family members from potential disagreements. Sometimes, it could also be a result of personal choices or lifestyles that family members may find difficult to accept. Effective communication and efforts to address underlying issues are crucial for healing and potentially reestablishing a sense of belonging within the family circle.
  22. No financial support: While financial support may not always be possible, a complete lack of assistance during times of need can be a sign that your family does not prioritize your welfare.
  23. Manipulation and control: A controlling or manipulative family dynamic can be emotionally damaging. Caring families respect individual autonomy.
  24. They belittle you: Constant belittling and undermining of your self-esteem is a sign of emotional abuse and a lack of care. They judge you about every little thing from your finances to how you live your life, or go behind your back to try and find out things about you, rather than asking you outright.
  25. Emotional or physical abuse: Any form of abuse within a family is a severe sign that your well-being is not a priority. Seek help and support if you are in this situation.

The Weight of Family’s Lack of Support: Impact on Mental Health

It can have a profound impact on an individual’s mental health if your family gives you a lack of support in your well-being and finances. The absence of familial backing can manifest in various ways, affecting emotional well-being, self-esteem, and overall mental stability.

  1. Emotional Strain and Isolation: When family members fail to provide the needed support, individuals can experience feelings of isolation and loneliness. The sense of being disconnected from one’s own family can be emotionally devastating. This isolation can lead to depression, anxiety, and a host of other mental health issues as individuals struggle to cope with the void created by the absence of familial support.
  2. Self-Esteem and Self-Worth: Family is often where we derive our sense of self-worth and identity. When family members do not show support or appreciation for an individual’s goals, choices, or achievements, it can erode self-esteem. Constant criticism or indifference can lead to a negative self-image and hinder personal growth and development.
  3. Stress and Anxiety: Family conflict or a lack of support can lead to chronic stress and anxiety. The constant tension and emotional turmoil associated with strained familial relationships can take a toll on an individual’s mental health, often resulting in a state of heightened anxiety and persistent stress.
  4. Impacts on Decision-Making: The absence of family support can also affect an individual’s decision-making process. Fear of judgment or disapproval from family members can lead to self-doubt and hesitancy in pursuing one’s goals or aspirations. This, in turn, can stifle personal growth and lead to feelings of regret or unfulfillment.
  5. Seeking Professional Help: When faced with a lack of familial support and its adverse effects on mental health, seeking professional help is a crucial step. Therapists and counselors can provide valuable guidance and strategies to cope with emotional distress, rebuild self-esteem, and develop healthy coping mechanisms.
  6. Building Support Networks: While family support is invaluable, it’s essential to remember that support can come from various sources. Building a strong network of friends, mentors, or support groups can help mitigate the effects of a family’s lack of support. These individuals can offer the understanding, validation, and encouragement that may be missing within the family circle.

Conclusion

Recognizing that your family may not care about you can be a painful and difficult realization. It’s essential to remember that you deserve love, care, and support in your life. If you identify with several of the signs mentioned above, consider seeking professional help or reaching out to friends and support networks to create a more nurturing and caring environment for yourself.

When your family blows you off and cancels meetings/appointments at the last minute or makes snide innuendos about but life, finances, and health you have to decide do you need to have toxic people in your life.

When your family brags about their achievements, and their material expenditures, their world adventures, whilst you may be struggling to make ends meet and they give you no support in terms of liking and sharing your social media posts and connection requests, you have to decide if is it worth you having them in your life. When you share good news and they ignore you, you have to ask yourself why they are behaving the way they do. Don’t hold grudges, just move on, one day they will live to regret their actions.

Understanding the reasons behind this perception can help you navigate these complex dynamics and work towards building healthier, more supportive relationships within your family. Effective communication, empathy, and a willingness to address underlying issues can go a long way in bridging the gap and fostering a stronger sense of care and connection among family members.

The absence of family support can have a profound and lasting impact on an individual’s mental health. It’s crucial to recognize the signs of this issue and seek professional help when needed. Additionally, cultivating alternative support networks can provide the emotional reinforcement necessary to navigate the challenges created by a family’s lack of understanding and support. Ultimately, taking care of one’s mental health is a deeply personal and essential journey, even when family support is not readily available.

Further Reading

https://disabledentrepreneur.uk/category/mental-health/

https://disabledentrepreneur.uk/useful-links/

https://disabledentrepreneur.uk/useful-links-2/

https://cymrumarketing.com/landlords-and-tenants-useful-links/

https://disabledentrepreneur.uk/finance-matters-useful-links/

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#mentalhealth #support #empathy #lackofempathy #selfesteem #empowerment #motivation #respect #lackofrespect #boundaries #negligence #gaslighting #stress #anxiety

How to Stop Feeling Depressed: A Comprehensive Guide to Regaining Your Mental Well-Being

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Depression can be a combination of stress, anxiety, and grief.

How to Stop Feeling Depressed: A Comprehensive Guide to Regaining Your Mental Well-Being

Depression is a complex and challenging mental health condition that affects millions of people worldwide. It can sap your energy, alter your perspective, and make everyday life feel like an insurmountable hurdle. While there is no quick fix for depression, there are numerous strategies and techniques you can use to help alleviate its symptoms and work towards recovery. well-being.

  1. Seek Professional Help: The first step in dealing with depression is seeking professional help. A qualified mental health provider, such as a therapist, psychologist, or psychiatrist, can assess your condition and create a tailored treatment plan. They may recommend therapy, medication, or a combination of both. Don’t hesitate to reach out to a healthcare professional, as they have the knowledge and experience to guide you through this challenging time.
  2. Open Up to Someone You Trust: Sharing your feelings with someone you trust can be incredibly therapeutic. Whether it’s a friend, family member, or partner, having a support system can help you feel less isolated and more understood. They can provide a listening ear and emotional support during difficult moments. Alternatively, start an online journal and document how you feel, this will give people the opportunity to interact and relate to what you are going through. Join online groups, where you can share your story with a community. You should never suffer in silence, there will be always someone you can talk to and we have a list of useful resources you can check out here!
  3. Prioritize Self-Care: Self-care is a fundamental aspect of managing depression. Pay attention to your physical and emotional needs: (a) Establish a Routine: Create a daily schedule that includes regular sleep, healthy meals, exercise, and relaxation time. A structured routine can provide stability and a sense of purpose. (b) Get Enough Sleep: Aim for 7-9 hours of quality sleep each night. Proper rest is crucial for mood regulation and overall mental health. (c) Exercise Regularly: Physical activity has been shown to release endorphins, which can improve mood. Even a short daily walk can make a difference. (d) Eat a Balanced Diet: Nutrient-rich foods can positively impact your mood and energy levels. Avoid excessive caffeine, alcohol, and sugary foods, which can exacerbate depression. (e) Practice Mindfulness and Relaxation Techniques: Mindfulness meditation, deep breathing exercises, and progressive muscle relaxation can help reduce stress and improve your emotional well-being.
  4. Challenge Negative Thoughts: Depression often involves negative thought patterns and self-critical thinking. Try to identify these thoughts and challenge them with evidence-based reasoning. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a helpful approach for changing negative thought patterns and promoting a more positive outlook.
  5. Engage in Activities You Enjoy: Depression can rob you of your interest in activities you once enjoyed. However, pushing yourself to engage in these activities can help combat depressive symptoms. Whether it’s a hobby, a sport, or a creative pursuit, doing things you love can provide a sense of accomplishment and pleasure.
  6. Set Realistic Goals: Set achievable goals for yourself, no matter how small they may seem. Accomplishing even minor tasks can boost your self-esteem and motivation. Break larger goals into smaller, manageable steps to make them less daunting.
  7. Build a Social Support Network: Maintaining social connections is crucial for mental health. Reconnect with old friends, join support groups, or consider group therapy. Surrounding yourself with understanding and supportive individuals can be a source of strength during tough times.
  8. Limit Stressors: Identify and reduce sources of stress in your life. This may involve setting boundaries at work, reevaluating your commitments, or seeking professional help for specific stress-related issues.
  9. Consider Medication: In some cases, medication prescribed by a healthcare professional may be necessary to manage depression. Antidepressant medications can help regulate brain chemistry and alleviate symptoms. It’s essential to consult a healthcare provider to discuss the potential benefits and risks of medication.

Things you should avoid doing if you are feeling depressed.

When you’re feeling depressed, it’s essential to be mindful of your actions and choices to prevent exacerbating your symptoms.

Here is a list of things you should avoid doing if you are experiencing depression:

  1. Isolating Yourself: One of the most common tendencies when feeling depressed is to withdraw from social interactions. Isolation can intensify feelings of loneliness and despair. Try to maintain connections with friends and loved ones, even if it is only online.
  2. Ignoring Professional Help: Avoid neglecting the importance of seeking professional assistance. A mental health provider can offer guidance, therapy, and, if necessary, medication to help manage your depression.
  3. Self-Medicating with Alcohol or Drugs: Using substances like alcohol or drugs as a coping mechanism can worsen depression symptoms, lead to addiction, and create more significant mental health issues. Seek healthier ways to cope.
  4. Negative Self-Talk: Be mindful of the way you speak to yourself. Constant self-criticism and negative self-talk can deepen feelings of worthlessness. Challenge and replace these thoughts with more positive and realistic ones.
  5. Overloading Yourself with Responsibilities: Trying to manage too many tasks or responsibilities can be overwhelming and exacerbate feelings of stress and hopelessness. Prioritize self-care and set realistic limits.
  6. Skipping Meals or Overeating: Nutrition plays a significant role in mood regulation. Skipping meals or turning to unhealthy comfort foods can negatively affect your mood. Aim for a balanced diet with regular meals.
  7. Engaging in Self-Harm: Self-harm, such as cutting or burning, is never a healthy way to cope with depression. If you are struggling with self-harm tendencies, seek immediate professional help or reach out to a trusted person in your life.
  8. Ruminating on Negative Thoughts: Repeatedly dwelling on negative thoughts and past regrets can intensify feelings of hopelessness and sadness. Practice techniques like mindfulness to redirect your focus to the present moment.
  9. Avoiding Physical Activity: A sedentary lifestyle can contribute to feelings of lethargy and exacerbate depression. Even light physical activity, such as a short walk, can improve mood and energy levels.
  10. Staying in Unhealthy Relationships: Toxic or abusive relationships can contribute to depression. If possible, distance yourself from unhealthy connections and seek support from friends, family, or professionals.
  11. Comparing Yourself to Others: Constantly comparing yourself to others, especially on social media, can lead to feelings of inadequacy and low self-esteem. Remember that people often present curated versions of their lives online.
  12. Ignoring Warning Signs: If you notice concerning changes in your behavior, mood, or thought patterns, don’t dismiss them. These signs may indicate that your depression is worsening, and it’s crucial to seek help promptly.
  13. Avoiding Sunshine and Nature: Lack of exposure to natural light and outdoor environments can impact your mood negatively. Spend time outdoors, even if it’s just a few minutes in your backyard or a nearby park.
  14. Ignoring Hygiene and Self-Care: Neglecting personal hygiene and self-care can make you feel worse about yourself. Establish a daily routine that includes basic self-care activities like showering and grooming.
  15. Suppressing Your Feelings: Avoid bottling up your emotions. Find healthy outlets for expressing your feelings, whether through journaling, talking to someone you trust, or creative endeavors like art or music.

Depression in most cases is a treatable condition, although people can relapse from time to time depending on their circumstances such as anxiety, stress, and worry e.g. rent increases and not having enough money to live on.

Grief Can Prolong Your Depression.

Grief can potentially prolong or exacerbate depression. Grief is a normal response to loss, and it can trigger depressive symptoms. When someone experiences prolonged or complicated grief, it can significantly impact their mental and emotional well-being. Grief-related depression often involves persistent sadness, hopelessness, and difficulty finding joy in life. If grief is left unprocessed or unaddressed, it can contribute to the development of clinical depression. Seeking support and professional help can be crucial in managing both grief and depression, as they may require different therapeutic approaches and interventions.

Grief can also play an important factor when someone close to you dies. Grief can last for days, weeks, months, or years or you may never get over losing your loved ones.

Grief is a natural emotional response to loss, and it can be triggered by a wide range of experiences and circumstances.

Here is a list of reasons why someone may experience grief:

  1. Death of a Loved One: The most common and well-known cause of grief is the death of a family member, friend, or pet.
  2. Divorce or Relationship Breakup: The end of a significant romantic relationship can lead to profound feelings of loss and grief.
  3. Loss of a Job: Being laid off or losing a job can result in grief, as it often involves the loss of financial security and a sense of purpose.
  4. Loss of a Friendship: The ending of a close friendship or the drifting apart of friends can lead to feelings of grief and loneliness.
  5. Miscarriage or Stillbirth: The loss of a pregnancy or the death of a baby before or shortly after birth can be an immensely painful and grief-inducing experience.
  6. Health Diagnosis: A severe or terminal illness diagnosis for oneself or a loved one can trigger anticipatory grief as individuals grapple with the idea of loss.
  7. End of a Dream or Goal: Failing to achieve a long-held dream, such as a career aspiration, academic goal, or personal achievement, can lead to grief over the loss of that vision for the future.
  8. Moving or Relocation: Leaving a familiar home, neighborhood, or city can result in feelings of loss and nostalgia for what was left behind.
  9. Pet Loss: The death or loss of a beloved pet can be deeply painful and elicit grief, as pets often become part of the family.
  10. Natural Disasters: Survivors of natural disasters, such as hurricanes, earthquakes, or wildfires, may experience grief for the loss of their homes, and belongings, and a sense of security.
  11. Loss of Independence: As individuals age or experience a disability or illness, the loss of independence and the ability to perform everyday tasks can lead to feelings of grief.
  12. Cultural or Community Changes: Changes in cultural traditions, societal norms, or community structures can evoke a sense of grief and loss.
  13. Loss of a Sibling: Losing a sibling, whether due to illness, accident, or other circumstances, can be a source of profound grief.
  14. Financial Loss: Experiencing significant financial setbacks, such as bankruptcy or the loss of investments, can lead to grief over the loss of financial security and stability.
  15. Loss of a Mentor or Role Model: Losing a mentor, coach, or someone you looked up to can evoke feelings of grief, especially if that person played a significant role in your life.
  16. Child Leaving for College or Moving Out: When children grow up and leave the family home, parents may experience grief over the change in their family dynamic.
  17. Loss of a Possession: Sentimental attachment to an object can result in grief when that object is lost, stolen, or destroyed.
  18. National or Global Tragedies: Events such as acts of terrorism, pandemics, or war can trigger collective grief as people mourn the loss of safety, security, or loved ones.

Grief is a highly individualized experience, and people may respond differently to various forms of loss. It’s essential to recognize and validate one’s feelings of grief and seek support when needed to navigate the mourning process effectively.

It’s essential to reach out for professional help and support from loved ones. Avoiding these harmful behaviors can contribute to your overall well-being as you work toward recovery.

Depression is a complex mental health condition that can manifest in various ways. It’s important to note that not everyone with depression will experience all of these symptoms, and the severity and duration of symptoms can vary from person to person.

Here is a list of common symptoms of depression:

  1. Persistent Sadness: Feeling sad, empty, or hopeless most of the day, nearly every day.
  2. Loss of Interest or Pleasure: A marked decrease in interest or pleasure in activities that were once enjoyed, including hobbies, social interactions, and passions.
  3. Fatigue and Low Energy: A constant feeling of fatigue and low energy, even after adequate rest or sleep.
  4. Changes in Appetite or Weight: Significant changes in appetite, leading to weight gain or loss. This can manifest as overeating or a lack of interest in food.
  5. Sleep Disturbances: Difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep, or experiencing excessive sleep (hypersomnia).
  6. Irritability or Agitation: Feeling easily irritable, restless, or having a short temper, even over minor issues.
  7. Difficulty Concentrating: Trouble concentrating, making decisions, or remembering things, often referred to as “brain fog.”
  8. Feelings of Worthlessness or Guilt: Persistent feelings of worthlessness, self-blame, or guilt, even when there is no rational basis for these emotions.
  9. Physical Symptoms: Unexplained physical symptoms such as headaches, stomachaches, or other pain that don’t respond well to treatment.
  10. Social Withdrawal: Avoiding social interactions, isolating oneself from friends and loved ones, and a general withdrawal from normal activities.
  11. Negative Self-Talk: Frequent negative thoughts about oneself, life, and the future, often characterized by self-criticism and pessimism.
  12. Suicidal Thoughts: Thoughts of death or suicide, or making plans or attempts to harm oneself. If you or someone you know is experiencing suicidal thoughts, seek help immediately.
  13. Loss of Libido: Decreased interest in sex or intimacy.
  14. Physical Sluggishness: Feeling physically slowed down, as if your body is heavy or difficult to move.
  15. Lack of Motivation: A pervasive lack of motivation to accomplish daily tasks or pursue goals.
  16. Changes in Patterns of Speech: Slowed speech, speaking less, or speaking with a sense of hopelessness.
  17. Unexplained Aches and Pains: Complaining of physical symptoms, such as joint pain or muscle aches, without a clear medical cause.
  18. Frequent Crying: Frequent episodes of crying or feeling overwhelmed by sadness.

Seeking help from a mental health professional is a critical step toward recovery. If you or someone you know is experiencing these symptoms, don’t hesitate to reach out to a therapist, counselor, psychiatrist, or a trusted healthcare provider for assessment and support. Depression is not a sign of weakness, and with the right treatment, many people can manage their symptoms and regain a fulfilling life.

Conclusion

Overcoming depression is a journey that requires time, effort, and patience. While there is no one-size-fits-all solution, the strategies outlined in this comprehensive guide can provide you with a solid foundation for managing depression and regaining your mental well-being. Remember that you are not alone in this struggle, and seeking help from professionals and loved ones can make a significant difference in your path to recovery.

Further Reading

https://disabledentrepreneur.uk/how-to-deal-with-grief/

https://disabledentrepreneur.uk/useful-links-2/

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#depression #clinicaldepression #anxiety #stress #emotionaldistress #mentalhealth #grief

OCD The Demon Inside My Head


Disclaimer: This article is sensitive and mentions suicide, anxiety, and depression.

OCD The Demon Inside My Head

The Complex Link Between Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Anxiety & Depression

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a mental health condition that affects millions of people worldwide. Characterized by intrusive, distressing thoughts (obsessions) and repetitive, ritualistic behaviors (compulsions), OCD can significantly disrupt an individual’s life. While OCD is often discussed in isolation, it is crucial to understand its intricate relationship with anxiety and depression, two prevalent co-occurring conditions that can exacerbate the challenges faced by those with OCD.

The Basics of OCD

OCD involves a cycle of obsessions and compulsions. Obsessions are unwanted, distressing thoughts, images, or urges that repeatedly invade a person’s mind. These thoughts often provoke significant anxiety. In an attempt to alleviate this anxiety, individuals with OCD engage in compulsions—repetitive behaviors or mental acts. While compulsions may provide temporary relief, they do not address the underlying anxiety and can even worsen the condition over time.

The Connection with Anxiety

Anxiety is a central feature of OCD. The anxiety triggered by obsessions is a key driving force behind the compulsive behaviors. People with OCD often engage in these rituals to reduce the intense anxiety caused by their intrusive thoughts. For instance, someone with an obsession with germs may repeatedly wash their hands to alleviate their anxiety, while another individual with intrusive violent thoughts may engage in mental rituals to neutralize those thoughts.

The relationship between OCD and anxiety is bidirectional. OCD can increase overall anxiety levels in a person’s life as the obsessions and compulsions consume time and energy. Conversely, pre-existing anxiety can make a person more vulnerable to developing OCD. This complex interplay between OCD and anxiety underscores the need for comprehensive treatment addressing both conditions.

The Link to Depression

Depression often accompanies OCD, compounding the emotional toll of the disorder. The chronic stress and frustration associated with OCD can lead to feelings of hopelessness, sadness, and despair. Additionally, individuals with OCD may become socially isolated due to the secretive nature of their compulsions, which can further contribute to depressive symptoms.

Moreover, the cyclical nature of OCD, with its repetitive and intrusive thoughts, can lead to rumination—a hallmark of depression. Rumination involves obsessively thinking about problems and their possible causes, consequences, and solutions, often leading to a worsening of mood.

Treatment Approaches

Effective treatment for OCD often involves addressing both the obsessive-compulsive symptoms and the associated anxiety and depression. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), specifically Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP), is a widely recommended therapeutic approach for OCD. ERP helps individuals confront their obsessions without engaging in compulsions, ultimately reducing anxiety. CBT can also address negative thought patterns that contribute to depression.

Medications, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are often prescribed to help manage OCD symptoms, as they can reduce anxiety and, in turn, alleviate depressive symptoms. However, medication alone is rarely sufficient for comprehensive treatment.

Support groups and individual therapy can provide invaluable emotional support and coping strategies for individuals with OCD. It is essential to involve loved ones in the recovery process to enhance understanding and provide a network of support.

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder is a complex mental health condition, closely linked with anxiety and depression. Recognizing this intricate relationship is crucial for providing effective treatment and support to those affected by OCD. A holistic approach that addresses both the obsessions and compulsions of OCD and the associated anxiety and depression can significantly improve the quality of life for individuals battling this challenging disorder. With the right support and treatment, individuals with OCD can learn to manage their symptoms and regain control over their lives.

A real sufferer true-life story.

I would first like to introduce myself I am a disabled entrepreneur. I have been in business for the last 30 years. I have decided to stay anonymous as I do not want people to judge me. I suffer from OCD (germ contamination and intrusive thoughts). Contrary to belief I do not spend hours washing my hands or cleaning. I used to and now I counteract this by using latex gloves. I found washing my hands (in undiluted Dettol) dried them up and made them crack. My mother would go through a full tank of hot water. I also used to have a thing where I could not mention certain names or words, namely my ex-boyfriend. I used to also have an issue with numbers but have overcome this. For example, I avoided the number 13 (unlucky for some), by coincidence it happens to be my birth date (don’t laugh). I believe my OCD is my security blanket so to speak, protecting me from harm.

Just because I have a mental health disability does not make me less intellectual than anyone else.

  1. https://disabledentrepreneur.uk/can-someone-have-ocd-and-still-be-intellectual/
  2. https://disabledentrepreneur.uk/breaking-down-mental-health-stigma-understanding-the-statistics/
  3. https://disabledentrepreneur.uk/mps-with-mental-health-disorders/
  4. https://disabledentrepreneur.uk/famous-people-with-ocd/

My OCD started to manifest about 35 years ago when my ex-boyfriend (P.E., I would have taken a bullet for him), decided to act suspiciously. I got curious after I found him a job working at a local Bank. In those days we did not have social media and these jobs were not always posted in the local paper. So when I visited the job center I applied on his behalf, I even chased them up after he had not heard from them and thanks to me he got an interview and the job.

Not Knowing – Dead or Alive?

From his LinkedIn profile, he is a regional manager for the West Midlands. Plot twist after reading what I thought was his obituary I contacted the bank and they said no one by that name is working in the West Midlands. I did try reaching out to his sister and seeing she hadn’t even opened up the message decided to delete the message completely. Maybe I should put an ad in the personal column of the local newspaper. Why do I need to do this?, basically speaking because I want closure. Yes, he hurt me emotionally more times than I care to remember but I loved him and I thought he was the one, my soul mate. However, looking back we were like chalk and cheese.

My story.

He would always make plans and then cancel at the last minute. Sometimes I would wait for him all night and eventually, he would turn up early hours and I would send him packing.

I met him on a blind date and his sister hated me from the start because the blind date was supposed to be for her boyfriend who changed his mind and asked her brother to take his place.

We were together for a year, he came from a middle-class family, whilst I came from a working-class background. His mother in particular did not like me because I sensed I did not meet with her approval and made remarks like “You could do much better than my son“, what mother says that unless she has an ulterior motive?

Moving on after he started to act suspiciously and after I found a lot of adult magazines and brothel brochures under his bed, I started to go through his pockets and found telephone numbers with girls’ names. I phoned the girls and each one of them confessed they had gone out on a date and the common denominator was they all were customers of the bank and had never given their number out. This would be a sackable offense if it was done in this day and age.

I kept the information quiet, I did not want to lose him, I loved him no matter what and would have done anything for him. If you can imagine Tom Cruise in the Top Gun movie that’s what he looked like and his LinkedIn profile picture now makes him look like David Cameron.

As time went on he would be less and less interested in being intimate. I tried to arouse him in my sexy underwear whilst he was putting his multigym together and his reply was I will never forget it to this day “Who would want to go near a fat walrus like you“, on the contrary, I was not fat, I was slim and I was modeling. I started to question myself if was I really fat and unattractive, I started to have self-doubts that I was not good enough. This should have been my opportunity to break up with him but I continued to stay in the hopes something would change and that he would love me as much as I loved him.

Genetics

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) does appear to have a genetic component, meaning that it can run in families. However, the inheritance pattern is complex, and multiple genetic and environmental factors likely contribute to the development of OCD. Here are some key points to consider:

  1. Family History: Research has shown that individuals with a family history of OCD are at a higher risk of developing the disorder themselves. This suggests that there may be a genetic predisposition.
  2. Twin and Family Studies: Studies on twins and families have provided evidence for a genetic component in OCD. Identical twins (who share 100% of their genes) are more likely to both have OCD if one twin has it compared to non-identical twins (who share about 50% of their genes). Similarly, first-degree relatives (parents, siblings, and children) of individuals with OCD have a higher risk of developing the disorder than the general population.
  3. Specific Genes: While researchers have identified some specific genes that may be associated with OCD, the genetic basis of the disorder is complex and not fully understood. Multiple genes are likely involved, and their interactions with environmental factors play a role.
  4. Environmental Factors: Environmental factors, such as childhood trauma, stress, and infections, may also contribute to the development of OCD. These factors can interact with genetic predisposition to increase the risk of the disorder.
  5. Neurobiological Factors: OCD is associated with abnormalities in brain structure and function, particularly in areas of the brain involved in regulating emotions and behavior. These neurobiological factors may be influenced by genetics.

It’s important to note that having a family history of OCD does not guarantee that an individual will develop the disorder. Many people with a family history of OCD do not develop symptoms, and conversely, some individuals without a family history of OCD do develop the disorder.

Overall, while genetics play a role in the development of OCD, it is a complex and multifactorial condition influenced by a combination of genetic, environmental, and neurobiological factors.

I believe genetics plays a factor in the development of OCD and there is a link in family history, because my grandmother suffered from it, my mother, my uncle and now me”.

Traumatic Event No 1:

The straw that broke the camel’s back was when he had to have medication for genital crabs. It was this that repelled me and started my OCD and even though I knew it was from his flings I still was willing to forgive him as long as he stopped doing what he was doing and committed 100% to me. Not long after, we broke up. He admitted he had found someone else that worked in the bank, I was devastated to the point I believe I had a nervous breakdown.

I remember that evening as I sobbed in my parent’s house and after my dad had gone to bed, raging at me to shut the f#ck up or he would kick me out. This caused an argument between my mother and father as she took my side and stuck up for me stating that no one was kicking me out.

As morning came around I tried to make an emergency appointment with my local GP to get something to calm me down and when the receptionist asked what was wrong with me and I declined to say she said “There is nothing wrong with you as your mouth is in working order”. I do not believe I was rude I was insistent that I needed an appointment, and I was feeling suicidal. I changed my doctors and got seen at a different surgery that very same day.

The days went into weeks and I could not get him out of my head. My OCD had taken over me and I could not touch things other people had touched before me without disinfecting things first.

I then decided to move away thinking a break would do me good. I moved to London but it was short-lived before returning home again. No sooner I was home I got a phone call from my ex saying he needed to see me. Like an idiot, I went to find his mantlepiece and TV strewn with engagement cards. Oblivious of what was around him he told me he missed me and wanted to have sex with me one last time. This was my cue to run and never return as I demanded he phone a taxi for me. He humiliated me again and kicked me in the teeth metaphorically speaking when I was feeling down and he was the reason my mental health declined.

Traumatic Event No 2:

I decided to leave home for good and found a job many miles away. This is where I met my husband who rescued me from a sexual assault, which caused my OCD to go through the roof. No sooner than the shops were open I bought 6 litres of Savolon Liquid, they did not stock Dettol so went to the bath and completely covered myself with the orange liquid. I felt dirty and humiliated again. It was my husband who pulled me through. He showered me with gifts took me out to fancy restaurants and put me on a pedestal.

My OCD was manageable but my husband would always complain that I refused to hold hands.

Trauma Event No 3:

Five years after meeting this man in shiningarmorr we got married and we started a business together. On the second day of what would have been our honeymoon a woman phoned wanting to speak with my husband, joyfully I said you could talk with his wife and that I would pass on the message. Her response was what caused my husband and I toarguet, two days into our marriage, she refused to give her name and said she wanted to speak to him on a private matter. My husband said she wanted to pass on security codes, so why did she not say that?

This caused my OCD to play up and I would make him have baths in Dettol and would be repelled at him touching me. Our marriage lasted three years after the company that I had financed was milked dry, by the manager and my husband. Both were to blame as both had access to the money. If I could turn back time I would have done things differently, knowing what I know now. There was about £120,000 missing from the business that I could not account for.

My depression then became bad I guess when my first relationship went south and I felt my whole world had collapsed around me there was nothing left to live for. In hindsight he did me afavorr otherwise I would be a boring housewife, it was the end of my marriage that finally broke me. He left our business in a mess whilst I was six months pregnant for the woman who by coincidence had phoned the office two days after we got married. Does that not scream alarm bells?

Traumatic Events No 4, 5, 6, 7, 10:

The passing of my loved ones. I won’t go into detail as it is too painful to recollect.

Traumatic Event No 8:

Whilst abroad a boy who was known to my daughter stole my daughter’s keys to my flat I knew nothing of this until I was woken at 5 am by a phone call from the Police saying that the door to my fat was wide open and the lights were on and music blaring asking where was I. I said I was abroad and when I returned, my home had been trashed and all my valuables stolen. The insurance company did not pay out because it was not a break-in. I lost £40,000 of camera equipment, computers and jewelry. To add insult to injury and as an added measure my landlord threatened me with eviction because my neighbors had phoned him and did not bother to notify me there was something suspicious going on.

Traumatic Event No 9:

I was involved with a guy who no longer lives in the UK who physically and mentally abused me. I do not want to go into what he did as I am not strong enough to talk about it. All I will say is he dislocated my knee by kicking it seven times, hence why I have problems with it now.

Traumatic Event No 10:

The obituary of not knowing if he is alive or dead. I lost touch with all his friends and his family. His parents and uncle have passed away and I do not know who else to ask other than do a press release.

Coping with grief.

  • No 1: P.E: The Traumatic Breakup
  • No 2: Barry Island: Sexual Assualt
  • No 3: The Divorce
  • No 4: J.M: Passing
  • No 5: L.M: Passing
  • No 6: B.R.M: Passing
  • No 7: A.B: Passing
  • No 8: The Robbery
  • No 9: E.S: Abusive Relationship
  • No 10. P.E: Passing

When people close to you die, you are left feeling hopeless living in an empty void.

I am constantly sad. I keep myself busy not to ‘THINK’ about all the hell I have gone through and how I miss the people who are no longer in my life. No money or anything you do can bring them back; all you are left with are photos and memories. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is a form of talking therapy and I have tried this as well as ‘exposure response therapy (ERP) again you need to be in the right frame of mind to resist your urges to make your anxiety subside. (I was mad to touch things that would cause a trigger and resist washing and disinfecting my hands) I resisted long enough the the therapist to leave and immediately went to wash my hands. For me this was a waste of time and no stranger is going to be my friend for me to confide in, hence CBT & ERP cannot help me and I prefer to use online journalling therapy or talk to Bing AI to write how I am feeling. Even journalling people can be judgemental but if you turn your comments off that sizzles that. I think I can handle a little criticism but will back off the moment any negativity becomes overwhelming.

My Symptoms.

  1. I have intrusive thoughts: If I do not do things a certain way something bad will happen to me. Or if I do not do something fast enough I am convinced something bad will happen.
  2. I have anxiety: When I have to wait for people to make a decision and play God with me, I get anxious. I worry a lot. This manifests into depression where I am sad and feel like crying. I get depressed when people take advantage of me and scam me. I get depressed when greedy people think they are better than me and put my rent up exponentially above the rate of inflation and against government rent cap guidelines. I get depressed when people show me no respect. I get anxious when I get judged and scrutinized. My anxiety finding more business and believe me I have done nearly everything other than sell my body on ‘OnlyFans’, just joking. Despite all the trauma in my life I still have some humour.
  3. Fear: I am afraid of being judged. People think they are better than you and often can come across as condescending. Just because I have a mental health disorder does not make me stupid.
  4. Germ Contamination: I cannot touch things with my bare hands that have not been disinfected first (food is in packaging and cooking at high temperatures kills germs. I cannot sit where someone else has sat, thinking they have not cleaned their posterior properly or have farted (pathogens).
  5. Dog Poo and Dog Hair: When I was going through my breakup with (P.E) a woman where I worked said she had to clean dog poo with her hands and then touch the swimwear in the factory I worked in. This caused my OCD to be problematic as I refused to talk to her and avoided any garments she had touched. This dog poo manifestation stuck with me as my mother also had OCD and had an obsession with dog poo. Animal hair like cat hair is also an issue and even though I do have a cat, I smooth him with latex gloves but won’t let him anywhere near me. Furthermore, I cannot be around people who own dogs including family that I do not see often but when I have to, I find it difficult to interact. An instance was last Christmas when I stayed in a cottage that my brother rented on Airbnb a few days earlier and I had to sleep in the bed. I could not wait to come home have a bath and wash and disinfect my clothes. I have not put my Cavali boots on again that I only wore once and am fighting the demons not to throw them away. Anything I cannot disinfect I normally bin.
  6. Personal hygiene: I cannot sit on my own toilet I have to hover. I must ensure my bath is germ-free before I get into it. I cannot share a bath after another person has used it. Or sleep in a bed that someone has slept in. My bathroom has to be quarantined. If I am vacuuming and the air blows out of the vent on me I have to change my clothes and disinfect myself.
  7. I do not like socializing: Is socializing going to put food on the table or drain my bank account? Wasting time talking about nonsense and the weather makes no sense to me, whilst making someone else richer and you get poorer. Brushing past people and touching things they have touched is impossible for me (Germs I cannot get the thoughts out of my head). My grocery shopping I touch with latex gloves and the contents are fine as most of the time they have not been touched by humans but by machines. Takeaways are fine as they have been cooked at high temperatures. I do not buy from places like Subway (e-coli). I am wary of my surroundings.
  8. Accidents: If I touch something by accident I have to disinfect that area and if it is my clothes I have to change and wash my clothes with detergent and Dettol. If a splash of dishwater ricochets on me it sends my OCD to overdrive. I have learned from CBT to try and fight my thoughts and sometimes it works and other times it does not, this all depends on how stressful my day is.
  9. My Rituals: I used to spend hours cleaning, but now I have quarantined areas, this in an office environment would be impossible to contain.
  10. Anger Management: I have a short fuse and will speak my mind, anyone who tries to rile me will feel my wrath. I have little patience for people who are condescending, rude, and lazy. I used to be a happy person but am not now. I have lost near enough everything that was important to me. I am now trying to rebuild my life one step at a time.
  11. My therapy: I have tried CBT (constant reminder, talking about my feelings and my past) and hypnotherapy but I cannot fight my thoughts. Hypnotherapy works to a certain degree but you have to be consistent with it on a daily basis. I also find journaling helps get things off my mind. It is not a cure but it helps ease anxiety and depression. My medication is a godsend, it sends me to sleep which is good but makes me really drowsy during the day, so to counteract this I drink two to three energy drinks a day. Ideally, I want to be medication-free and find another way to help overcome my OCD.
  12. My PPE: I wear latex gloves for everything I do and double up under rubber gloves when doing washing up. Every product I use has to be antibacterial, hand soap, washing up liquid, and bubble bath.

Negativity

I have distanced myself from humans and have little interaction in the physical sense of the world because too many people have taken advantage of me and hurt me in one way or another. I do not trust people easily. I have no problem interacting virtually but face to face is extremely difficult. Removing negativity from your life and socially disconnecting can be a powerful step toward personal growth and well-being. By consciously distancing yourself from toxic relationships, environments, or habits that breed negativity, you create space for positivity to flourish. This process involves setting boundaries, prioritizing self-care, and surrounding yourself with supportive and uplifting influences. While it may seem daunting to disconnect from certain social circles, it can ultimately lead to greater emotional resilience, mental clarity, and a renewed sense of purpose. Embracing this journey allows you to foster a more positive and fulfilling life, where your mental and emotional health take center stage.

“People have done this to me and caused me emotional distress to the point my mental health has declined.

I am trying to rebuild my life and perhaps if sharing my story will help someone, it will make me feel I am doing something right and worthwhile.

Moving Forward:

I am constantly learning about OCD and dealing with my health one day at a time. I do not need to speak with a therapist because everything I need can be found online or on this website. I have decided to share my story so the people who need to know can reference this.

I am not looking for sympathy or pity I just want to let people know that you do not know what is going on in someone’s life and everyone has a story to tell.

All I want is for my life to change for the better, that’s all I am asking.

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Social Detachment

Social Disconnection - A woman alone in a crowded place.

Social Detachment

The Impact of Modern Technology on Human Relationships

The world is more interconnected than ever before. Social media platforms, instant messaging, and virtual communication tools have revolutionized the way we interact with others. While these technological advancements offer countless benefits, they have also introduced a troubling side effect: social disconnection and detachment. As we become increasingly reliant on screens and virtual relationships, the authentic human connections that once enriched our lives are at risk of fading away.

The Rise of Social Disconnection

Despite the apparent connectivity facilitated by technology, studies show a paradoxical trend of increasing social isolation and disconnection. People are spending more time engaging with screens and virtual personas, leading to a decline in face-to-face interactions. Social media platforms, while designed to connect individuals, often result in superficial interactions, leaving users feeling more detached from real-life relationships.

Causes of Social Disconnection

  1. Virtual Overload: The lure of virtual worlds, online gaming, and social media can lead to excessive screen time. Spending more time in the digital realm reduces opportunities for in-person connections, leading to feelings of social detachment.
  2. Fear of Missing Out (FOMO): Social media presents a distorted reality where people showcase only the best aspects of their lives. Constant exposure to seemingly perfect lives can cause feelings of inadequacy, leading individuals to withdraw or disengage from social interactions.
  3. Erosion of Empathy: Online communication often lacks the nuances of face-to-face interaction, making it easier for people to be less empathetic toward others’ feelings and experiences.
  4. Cyberbullying: The anonymity of the internet can embolden individuals to engage in hurtful behaviors, causing emotional distress and encouraging others to withdraw from social interactions.

Consequences of Social Disconnection

  1. Loneliness and Depression: Social isolation can lead to increased feelings of loneliness and depression. Without meaningful connections, individuals may lack emotional support and understanding, exacerbating mental health issues.
  2. Weakened Interpersonal Skills: Reduced face-to-face interactions hinder the development of crucial social skills, such as active listening, empathy, and conflict resolution, impacting both personal and professional relationships.
  3. Decline in Physical Health: Studies suggest that social disconnection can have adverse effects on physical health, including higher levels of stress, weakened immune systems, and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases.
  4. Disintegration of Community: A society characterized by social detachment can lead to a decline in community cohesion and engagement. Strong communities are built on robust social bonds, and their absence can result in increased division and fragmentation.

Reconnecting in the Digital Age

  1. Set Boundaries: Establish limits on screen time and prioritize face-to-face interactions with friends, family, and colleagues.
  2. Foster Empathy: Encourage open and honest communication, both online and offline. Practice empathy and understanding to bridge the gap between virtual and real-life interactions.
  3. Volunteer and Join Groups: Participate in community activities, volunteer programs, or interest-based groups to meet like-minded individuals and build genuine connections.
  4. Mindful Social Media Use: Be mindful of how social media affects your emotions and self-perception. Unfollow accounts that evoke negative feelings and focus on fostering meaningful connections.
  5. Seek Professional Help: If feelings of social disconnection and detachment persist, consider seeking support from a mental health professional or counselor.

Conclusion

While modern technology has undeniably transformed the way we communicate and interact, it is crucial to be aware of its potential negative impacts. Social disconnection and detachment can lead to various personal and societal issues, but by fostering authentic connections and being mindful of our digital habits, we can reclaim the essence of human relationships in the digital age. Remember, a healthy balance between virtual and real-world interactions is key to a fulfilling and connected life.

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Financial Hardship Impact On Mental Health

Financial Hardship Impact On Mental Health

Financial hardship can have a significant impact on mental health. Financial stressors can cause anxiety, depression, and a range of other mental health issues. Financial challenges can impact all areas of life, including personal relationships, job performance, and overall well-being.

Financial hardship is defined as a situation in which an individual or family is struggling to make ends meet. This may be due to job loss, unexpected expenses, or mounting debt. Whatever the cause, financial hardship can take a significant toll on mental health. The stress of worrying about how to pay bills or provide for one’s family can lead to anxiety and depression. These mental health issues can be compounded by the stigma and shame that often comes with financial struggles.

The link between financial hardship and mental health is well-established. A study by the American Psychological Association found that people with low incomes are more likely to experience mental health issues than those with higher incomes. The same study also found that people with financial stress are more likely to report physical health problems.

The impact of financial hardship on mental health is not limited to those with low incomes. Even individuals with higher incomes may experience financial challenges that lead to mental health issues. For example, someone who loses a high-paying job may struggle to adjust to a lower income and may experience anxiety and depression as a result.

Managing the stress that comes with financial challenges is critical to maintaining mental health. There are several steps that individuals can take to manage their stress and protect their mental health during times of financial hardship. The first step is to acknowledge the problem and seek help if needed. This may involve reaching out to a financial advisor or therapist who can provide support and guidance.

Other steps that can help manage the stress of financial hardship include creating a budget, reducing expenses, and seeking financial assistance if needed. Taking care of one’s physical health is also essential. Exercise, healthy eating, and getting enough sleep can all help reduce stress and improve mental health.

Finally, it is important to remember that financial challenges are a common experience. There is no shame in struggling to make ends meet, and seeking help is a sign of strength, not weakness. By taking steps to manage stress and protect mental health, individuals can weather financial challenges and emerge stronger and more resilient.

Financial hardship can have a significant impact on mental health. The stress of worrying about finances can lead to anxiety, depression, and other mental health issues. However, by acknowledging the problem, seeking help, and taking steps to manage stress, individuals can protect their mental health during times of financial hardship. Remember, financial challenges are a common experience, and seeking help is a sign of strength, not weakness.

How your landlord can cause you emotional distress with rent increases

As a tenant, paying rent is a necessary and often stressful part of the rental process. While rent increases are a common occurrence in the rental market, they can cause emotional distress for tenants. Unfortunately, some landlords may intentionally or unintentionally cause emotional distress through rent increases. Here’s how landlords can cause emotional distress with rent increases, and what tenants can do about it.

Firstly, landlords may suddenly increase the rent without providing adequate notice or explanation. This can lead to a feeling of uncertainty and anxiety for tenants, who may worry about their ability to afford the new rent. In some cases, tenants may also feel betrayed by their landlords, especially if they have had a good relationship up until this point.

Another way landlords can cause emotional distress with rent increases is by raising the rent to an unaffordable level. This can be especially devastating for low-income tenants who are already struggling to make ends meet. Rent increases that force tenants to choose between paying rent and buying groceries or paying other bills can lead to feelings of hopelessness and despair.

Landlords can also cause emotional distress by being unresponsive to tenant concerns about rent increases. When tenants reach out to their landlords with questions or concerns about rent increases, they may feel ignored or dismissed. This can lead to feelings of frustration, anger, and powerlessness.

So, what can tenants do to cope with rent increases and prevent emotional distress? Here are a few tips:

  • Stay informed: Keep up-to-date with your local rental market and rent control laws. Knowing your rights as a tenant can help you better navigate rent increases and protect yourself from unfair treatment.
  • Communicate with your landlord: If you have concerns about a rent increase, talk to your landlord about it. Be clear and respectful about your concerns, and ask for an explanation of the rent increase. If your landlord is unresponsive or dismissive, consider reaching out to a tenant advocacy group for support.
  • Budget carefully: If your rent increases, take some time to re-evaluate your budget and adjust your spending accordingly. Look for areas where you can cut back on expenses and save money.
  • Consider moving: If the rent increase is too much for you to afford, consider moving to a more affordable rental property. Be sure to give your landlord adequate notice and follow the terms of your lease.

Rent increases can cause emotional distress for tenants, especially if they are sudden, unaffordable, or unresponsive. Tenants can protect themselves by staying informed, communicating with their landlords, budgeting carefully, and considering moving if necessary. Remember that you have rights as a tenant, and you deserve to be treated with respect and fairness by your landlord.

Suing someone for emotional distress

Suing someone for emotional distress is a legal action that allows an individual to seek compensation for the mental and emotional harm caused by the actions of another person. Emotional distress can be a severe and debilitating condition that affects an individual’s daily life and ability to function normally. The legal system recognizes the seriousness of emotional distress and provides an avenue for individuals to seek redress for the harm caused by another.

Emotional distress can arise from a wide range of situations. For example, it can result from the intentional actions of another person, such as harassment or abuse, or it can result from negligent actions, such as a car accident or medical malpractice. Emotional distress can also be a byproduct of a traumatic event, such as a natural disaster, terrorist attack, or crime.

To successfully sue someone for emotional distress, the plaintiff must prove that the defendant’s actions caused emotional harm. This can be a challenging task, as emotional distress is often difficult to quantify and prove. The plaintiff must also demonstrate that the emotional distress was severe enough to warrant compensation.

To prove emotional distress, the plaintiff must provide evidence of the harm caused by the defendant’s actions. This can include medical records, witness testimony, and expert testimony from mental health professionals. The plaintiff may also need to demonstrate that they have suffered financial losses as a result of the emotional distress, such as lost wages or medical expenses.

If the plaintiff is successful in proving their case, they may be entitled to compensation for their emotional distress. This can include damages for pain and suffering, loss of enjoyment of life, and medical expenses. The amount of compensation awarded will depend on the severity of the emotional distress and the extent of the harm caused by the defendant’s actions.

It is essential to note that emotional distress lawsuits can be complex and challenging to navigate. It is always recommended to seek the assistance of an experienced attorney to guide you through the legal process. A qualified attorney can help you gather the necessary evidence, build a strong case, and negotiate a fair settlement on your behalf.

Editors Notes:

Suing someone for emotional distress is a serious matter that should not be taken lightly. Emotional distress can have a significant impact on an individual’s life and well-being. If you have been the victim of emotional distress, you have the right to seek compensation for the harm caused by another person’s actions. With the help of an experienced attorney/solicitor, you can navigate the legal system and obtain the justice you deserve.

Finding free or affordable legal help – Citizens Advice

Exceptional Case Funding – Public Law Project

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How A Missed Call Can Give You Anxiety

How A Missed Call Can Give You Anxiety

In today’s fast-paced world, communication has become more comfortable than ever. With the advent of technology, people can connect with each other from different parts of the world through various channels such as messaging, emails, social media, and phone calls. One of the most common forms of communication is a phone call, but sometimes, even a missed call can lead to anxiety. In this article, we will discuss how a missed call can give you anxiety.

Firstly, a missed call from a loved one can cause anxiety because it might signify an emergency. When you see a missed call from your parents, spouse, or children, you automatically assume that something is wrong. The feeling of uncertainty and not knowing what the call was about can make you anxious. Your mind starts to wander and imagine all sorts of worst-case scenarios, which can be stressful.

Secondly, a missed call from a potential employer can cause anxiety because you might miss an opportunity. When you are actively looking for a job, and you miss a call from a hiring manager or recruiter, it can be frustrating. You may worry that you missed your chance to impress them, and they will move on to another candidate. This fear of missing out can cause anxiety and stress.

Thirdly it is unprofessional to not leave a voicemail and expect the recipient to mind read. Not leaving the message will cause a person to get worried and anxious especially if they call back and the call goes into the answering machine.

There are consequences to people’s actions.

Some people may be anxious about the missed call itself. They may worry that they will never find out who called them or why, or that the call was important but they missed it. This fear can be particularly acute for people who have a fear of missing out (FOMO) or who have a tendency to overthink and ruminate.

If you experience anxiety due to missed calls, there are several things you can do to manage your anxiety. Firstly, try to identify the root cause of your anxiety. Are you worried about missing important calls, or are you anxious about the person who missed the call? Once you understand the source of your anxiety, you can take steps to address it.

For example, if you are worried about missing important calls, you can set up call forwarding or voicemail to ensure that you don’t miss any important messages. If you are anxious about the person who missed the call, you can reach out to them and check in to see how they are doing. If you are anxious about the missed call itself, you can try to reframe your thinking and remind yourself that most missed calls are not emergencies and can be returned at a later time.

In addition to these practical steps, there are also several self-care techniques that can help you manage your anxiety. These include exercise, deep breathing, meditation, and mindfulness. By taking care of your physical and mental health, you can reduce your overall levels of anxiety and stress.

A missed call can trigger anxiety for a variety of reasons. If you experience anxiety due to missed calls, it’s important to identify the root cause of your anxiety and take steps to address it. By setting up call forwarding or voicemail, reaching out to the person who missed the call, and practicing self-care techniques, you can manage your anxiety and reduce your stress levels. Remember, most missed calls are not emergencies, and can be returned at a later time.

How anxiety can affect a person’s life

Anxiety is a natural human emotion that we all experience at some point in our lives. It is a feeling of worry, fear, or apprehension about what may happen in the future. While it is normal to feel anxious in certain situations, excessive and ongoing anxiety can be debilitating and can negatively affect a person’s life in many ways.

Anxiety can affect a person’s physical health. When we feel anxious, our bodies go into “fight or flight” mode, releasing stress hormones like adrenaline and cortisol. These hormones can cause physical symptoms such as rapid heartbeat, sweating, and shaking. Over time, chronic anxiety can lead to other health problems such as high blood pressure, heart disease, and a weakened immune system.

Anxiety can also impact a person’s mental health. It can cause feelings of dread, panic, and constant worry. These feelings can lead to insomnia, difficulty concentrating and decreased productivity. Anxiety can also cause a person to become socially isolated, as they may avoid situations or people that trigger their anxiety.

Anxiety can also affect a person’s relationships. It can cause a person to become irritable, short-tempered, and withdrawn, which can strain relationships with friends, family, and romantic partners. Anxiety can also make it difficult for a person to form new relationships, as they may feel too anxious or insecure to initiate contact.

In addition to affecting physical health, mental health, and relationships, anxiety can also impact a person’s career. Anxiety can cause a person to miss work, have difficulty completing tasks, and miss out on opportunities for advancement. It can also make it difficult to maintain positive working relationships with colleagues.

Furthermore, anxiety can also affect a person’s financial well-being. If anxiety is severe enough to cause missed work, it can lead to a loss of income. Additionally, anxiety can lead to increased healthcare costs as a person seeks treatment for their symptoms.

Overall, anxiety can have a significant impact on a person’s life, affecting their physical health, mental health, relationships, career, and finances. While it is important to seek treatment if anxiety is interfering with daily life, there are also steps a person can take to manage their symptoms, such as practicing relaxation techniques, exercising regularly, and seeking support from loved ones. By taking these steps, a person can reduce the impact that anxiety has on their life and regain a sense of control.

The domino effect of people’s actions regarding mental health

Mental health is a crucial aspect of our overall well-being. It affects how we feel, think, and behave, and it can have a significant impact on our quality of life. Unfortunately, mental health issues are widespread, and many people struggle with them in silence.

While mental health is a personal issue, it’s important to remember that our actions can have a domino effect on others. For instance, when we take care of our mental health, we inspire others to do the same. When we stigmatize mental health issues or downplay their significance, we create a ripple effect that can harm people around us.

The domino effect of our actions regarding mental health can manifest in many ways. Here are a few examples:

  1. Stigma and Shame

One of the most common ways our actions can affect mental health is through stigma and shame. When we stigmatize mental health issues, we create an environment where people feel ashamed to seek help. This can lead to a domino effect where people suffer in silence, and their mental health deteriorates over time.

To combat this, we must work to create a culture that is accepting and understanding of mental health issues. This means promoting open dialogue and education about mental health, challenging negative stereotypes, and encouraging people to seek help when they need it.

  1. Support and Understanding

On the other hand, when we offer support and understanding to those struggling with mental health issues, we create a domino effect of positivity. When someone feels supported and heard, they are more likely to seek help and take steps to improve their mental health. This, in turn, can inspire others to do the same, creating a positive ripple effect.

  1. Self-care and Personal Responsibility

Our actions also have a domino effect on our own mental health. When we prioritize self-care and take responsibility for our mental well-being, we inspire others to do the same. This can create a domino effect of positive habits and behaviors that benefit everyone.

For instance, when we prioritize self-care by getting enough sleep, eating well, and exercising regularly, we are better equipped to manage stress and cope with challenging situations. This, in turn, can inspire others to prioritize their own self-care and improve their mental health.

Conclusion

Our actions have a significant impact on mental health, both on our own and on those around us.

By being selfish and not taking into account people’s mental health, not leaving voicemails says a lot about the person. It shows unprofessionalism if the entity phoning is part of a business and it shows that the caller does not care about the consequences of their actions.

The domino effect of selfishness can cause the recipient a catalyst of disorders, such as stress, anxiety, emotional distress, fear, depression, insomnia, and depression.

By promoting acceptance, support, and self-care, we can create a domino effect of positive change that benefits everyone. However the domino effect can also cause negativity, by selfish people that do not care how the recipient may feel.

This actually happened to me today and when I phoned back my call went to voice mail where I did leave a message. I will try and contact the entity again if they do not email me and will give them a link to this post via SMS to teach them that not leaving a message has caused unnecessary stress and anxiety, which all adds up to my healing process. Putting spanners in the works only causes setbacks. I am now worried about what this person wanted from me. I hope the universe pays her back as the caller was a (she), because now I will be up all night worrying.

Apologizing is a lame excuse, the damage has been done and there is nothing anyone can do to undo their thoughtlessness. Saying sorry, are just words, they do not mean anything, and they will not bring food to the table if the recipient becomes unwell because of a person’s selfish act.

It’s up to us to take responsibility for our actions and create a culture that prioritizes mental health and well-being and not be selfish.

Content Writing For Your Health Sites!

Further Reading

#anxiety #stress #worry #negativethoughts #intrusivethoughts #panicattacks #mentalhealth #insomnia #stigma #selfishness #selfishness #empathy #consequences #dominoeffect

Burnout Syndrome

Burnout Syndrome

Burnout syndrome is a condition that is becoming increasingly prevalent in modern society. It is a state of physical, mental, and emotional exhaustion that can occur when individual experiences prolonged and chronic stress at work or in their personal life. Burnout can have serious consequences on an individual’s physical and mental health, as well as their ability to function effectively in their work and personal lives.

Symptoms of burnout syndrome include chronic fatigue, loss of motivation and interest in work, feelings of detachment or cynicism towards work or others, reduced productivity, and a lack of sense of accomplishment or satisfaction. These symptoms can be both physical and emotional and may manifest differently for each individual.

The causes of burnout can be complex and multifaceted. It may be related to work-related stressors such as high workload, lack of control, low job satisfaction, or interpersonal conflicts with colleagues or supervisors. It may also be related to personal stressors such as family or financial problems, or lack of work-life balance.

Burnout syndrome can have significant consequences for individuals, including an increased risk of physical and mental health problems such as depression, anxiety, and cardiovascular disease. It can also have negative effects on relationships and social life, as well as on an individual’s career and work performance.

To prevent and address burnout syndrome, individuals and organizations need to take proactive steps to address the underlying causes of burnout. This may include reducing workloads, increasing job control, fostering positive relationships at work, promoting work-life balance, and providing resources and support for mental health and wellness.

Individuals can also prevent and address burnout by prioritizing self-care, setting healthy boundaries, and seeking support from friends, family, or mental health professionals when needed. This may include practicing stress-management techniques such as meditation, exercise, or therapy.

Conclusion

Burnout syndrome is a serious and growing concern in modern society, affecting individuals from all walks of life. It is important for individuals and organizations to take proactive steps to prevent and address burnout, including addressing the underlying causes of stress, promoting mental health and wellness, and prioritizing self-care. By taking these steps, individuals can reduce the risk of burnout and improve their overall health and well-being.

#burnout #burnoutsyndrome #exhaustion #stress #chronicfatigue #isolation #socialdisconnection #mentalhealth #depression #detachment

Anxiety: Understanding and Coping with a Common Emotional Disorder

Anxiety: Understanding and Coping with a Common Emotional Disorder

Anxiety is a common emotional disorder that affects millions of people around the world.

It is characterized by feelings of worry, nervousness, and fear, and it can have a significant impact on an individual’s quality of life. Despite its prevalence, many people still do not understand what anxiety is, how it develops, and how it can be treated.

What is Anxiety?

Anxiety is a normal response to stress and danger. It prepares us to face a challenge or respond to an emergency by increasing our heart rate, sweating, and tensing our muscles. However, anxiety becomes a problem when it interferes with our daily activities and causes significant distress.

There are several types of anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and specific phobias. Each type of anxiety disorder has unique symptoms, but all share the common theme of excessive, persistent worry and fear.

What Causes Anxiety?

The exact cause of anxiety is not well understood, but it is thought to be a combination of genetic, environmental, and psychological factors. People with a family history of anxiety are more likely to develop the disorder, and traumatic life events, such as abuse, neglect, or loss, can trigger anxiety symptoms. Additionally, chronic stress, substance abuse, and certain medical conditions can also contribute to the development of anxiety.

How to Manage Anxiety

Fortunately, anxiety is a treatable condition, and there are several effective strategies for managing its symptoms. Some of the most commonly used strategies include:

  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT): CBT is a type of therapy that helps individuals understand and change negative thoughts and behaviors that contribute to anxiety.
  • Medication: Antidepressant and anti-anxiety medications, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and benzodiazepines, can be effective in reducing anxiety symptoms.
  • Exercise: Regular exercise has been shown to have a positive impact on anxiety by reducing stress and improving mood.
  • Relaxation techniques: Techniques such as deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, and mindfulness can help reduce physical symptoms of anxiety and promote a sense of calm.
  • Lifestyle changes: Simple lifestyle changes, such as getting enough sleep, eating a healthy diet, and reducing caffeine and alcohol consumption, can also help reduce anxiety symptoms.

How Anxiety Affects Me

From a personal perspective anxiety comes and goes. It is the fear of the unknown that can spiral into stress, panic attacks, depression, and procrastination. For example, bearing in mind it is a Sunday so you would not expect any businesses to call you today, yet I noticed a missed call. Not knowing who it was that was calling me, I withheld my number and proceeded to call the number back and I was put through to the DWP.

Update Monday 13th February 2023. I had another missed call today and this time they left a message that they will phone me between 11 -12 despite me telling the PIP assessor I am in University Mon, Tue & Fri. I did accept the call when they rang and they said they are increasing my PIP payments as they needed some more information about my mobility. So it looks like they work Sundays as well.

Stress & Anxiety impact on a sufferer of multiple sclerosis.

Considering I have voice mail activated you would think the person that was trying to reach me would leave a message, but unfortunately, they didn’t which has now made me feel anxious and on edge. Stress and anxiety can cause a person suffering from multiple sclerosis to relapse. Relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) | Multiple Sclerosis Society UK (mssociety.org.uk)

Fortunately, I have my mum as my rock and she tried reassuring me that they will write to you if they cannot get in touch and that I needn’t worry as she will take care of things for me.

Conclusion

Anxiety is a common and treatable emotional disorder through medication, CBT therapy, and hypnosis. It can have a significant impact on an individual’s quality of life. By understanding its causes and learning how to manage its symptoms, people with anxiety can take back control of their lives and improve their overall well-being. If you are experiencing symptoms of anxiety, it is important to seek help from a mental health professional who can provide an accurate diagnosis and develop an effective treatment plan.

#ms #msrelapses #dep #pip #persoanlindependancepayments #stress #wory #anxiety #panicattacks #procrastination

Anxiety and Panic Attack, Personal Perspective

Anxiety and Panic Attack, Personal Perspective

Article Written and Published 9th December 2022 19.45 pm

This is a health update on how I am feeling today. It started off with Evri supposedly delivering two expensive parcels to my property with a photo of what looked like the side of a package and the pavement.

When I received the email I immediately went downstairs because I live in a First Floor Flat only to find nothing in the communal area, so my initial thought was to buzz my neighbor to see if they heard the buzzer go (seeing as I am partially deaf) and the woman said she did not hear anything. I then went outside and could not see anything.

So now I am starting to panic, I could feel my heart pumping faster and I started to shake.

Although this post is not entirely a medical guide I will still include a few links should you need to research further.

The symptoms I had were:

  • Shortness of breath or hyperventilating
  • Fastened heartbeat
  • Feeling ill and lightheaded
  • Feeling out of control or like you’re about to die (a distinctive sign of a panic attack!)
  • Tingling sensation in your fingers or lips
  • Shaking and sweating 
  • Chest pain 
  • Tearful
  • Anxious
  • Feeling out of control

Fear, Anxiety & Panic Attacks

My Anxiety

I continued the small talk and asked if they had sorted the problem with British Gas chasing them for £2K even though they have only lived in the property for two months if that. Now, this is the bit that started alarm bells ringing because I am in communication with British Gas who have said my address has been reverted back to Ground Floor on the 8th of November 2022 where the debt is (which has nothing to do with me). I was even told by British Gas that my meter was associated with the building rather than the flat according to the national database. I have not had any problems for 23 years and all of a sudden I am.

  • I am feeling very anxious over a lot of things right now. My brother and his wife and son are coming to the UK for Christmas and although it would be nice to see them, I am anxious because I do not know how well I can cope with my OCD. Furthermore, they expect me to travel which is a journey of 3 hours and I need to go to the loo every hour. Public toilets are out of the question. I can cope with my disability at home but doing what I do is humiliating and embarrassing when it’s done in front of other people that do not understand.
  • I feel anxious just in case they make a diversion and want to come to my home, I have anxiety issues when workmen and contractors come in let alone anyone else. If I had more money I would make the place look more liveable but as it stands it’s I place I work and lay my head to sleep.
  • Although I have agreed to meet with my brother, he does not realize the ordeal I have to go through to get from A to B, It is stressing me because he is not taking my disability seriously. I am already leaving my comfort zone and am testing my OCD thresh-hold. My daughter said if I do this now I won’t have to go through this again for a while. So fingers crossed on how well I cope with my disorder.

So going back to my missing parcels they were wedged between the pavement and the bin where anyone passing by could have swiped. Nice one Evri part of the Hermes group shower of company.

I feel very on edge and feel very tearful. My tolerance levels are nil. I have no patience and am very irritable. Put it this way I found one last valium that I saved in case of emergencies which was prescribed donkey years ago. I still feel my heart racing and the valium pill did jack sh#t 💩 to calm me down.

A few hours have now passed since the fiasco with the courier this afternoon and writing how I feel down has actually helped to a certain extent.

It’s easy to say don’t worry, or things will be ok, but unless you are walking in my shoes it’s hypocritical for someone to judge.

“I will continue carrying on, one step at a time, until one day the universe manifests my desires”.

I believe one day I will have everything I dreamed of. I believe nothing stays in the same place forever. I continue to keep myself busy, to stop myself from thinking about my past. I have set myself goals that I will strive to achieve and from this, I will be able to eradicate my memories. I will be able to help others to also put their past behind them and learn to overcome their fears. Everyone has down days even the richest people on the planet and everyone has a story to tell. The trick is learning to love, respect yourself and learn to forgive. My therapy is called “writing”, this can be a letter, a diary, a blog, or a book.

Writing releases the tension and puts it out to the universe, it is up to God to punish the perpetrators that have hurt you, whilst allowing you to rebuild your life.

“I carry a battlefield of wounds and from my own personal experiences will tell my story”.

My Book Is Coming Out In 2023

“Like a Pheonix, From the ashes, I will rise and God help anyone that stands in my way. I am a survivor warrior and am iRenata”.

#anxiety #panicattacks #depression #uncertanty #insecurity #lowselfesteem

Renata’s Online Health Journal Update 2022!

Renata’s Online Health Journal Update 2022!

People who shy away from people with mental health disorders or disabilities and label people as damaged goods usually have their own demons to contend with”.

I need to vent and let off steam before I blow a gasket.

The last few months have taken a toll on my health. As most of you know I am the Editor of ‘Disability UK – Disabled Entrepreneur Online Journal’ and have come to near enough a standstill with my business because of my health.

My Disabilities are Invisible.

I sometimes am so depressed it takes a lot of effort to do anything, these days.

Renata’s Online Journal Health Report

The following is a snippet of what I am going through.

I am disabled, I suffer from Cerebellar Atrophy, OCD, and Depression so it is no surprise that I have highs and lows. Yet most recently I have been experiencing very bad lows.

I do not have a support system and my GP is as useful as a chocolate fire guard. https://disabledentrepreneur.uk/gp-doctor-negligence-evidence/ To understand my health you will have to understand how the last few months have been for me and what I have gone through and am still going through.

Events 2022.

  1. I have been through war and back with ‘British Gas’, which I have reported to ‘Ombudsman’ who in turn report to ‘OFGEM’. ‘British Gas’ caused me humiliation, intimidation, harassment, and emotional distress.
  2. In another incident I had 40 emails from a credit card issuer (situation now under control), again I have experienced, humiliation, intimidation, harassment, and emotional distress. (They gave me £100 as a gesture of goodwill, with the understanding that if I endure more harassment I will report them to the Ombudsman). I know what they will say but she accepted the £100, which is just a band-aid on a gaping wound.
  3. Most recently my laptop started having a blue screen and eventually died, I have not been able to do anything online for about a week. I have simply used my phone to read and reply to emails and do research. This started making me sink into a very dark place.
  4. I then had a brand new computer and not even a week old I ended up with a BSOD, you just can’t make this stuff up. https://marketingagency.cymrumarketing.com/2022/08/24/lenovo-or-windows-fault-blue-screen-of-death-bsod-2022/
  5. My internet is intermittent, and I am getting the blame game excuse (it’s not us it must be you), this is an ongoing issue in which they gave 3 months of free broadband, but the issues are starting to happen again. Virgin Media Outage in Cardiff, Wales: Current Problems and Outages • Is The Service Down? UK
  6. I have lost clients due to the rise in the cost of living and them not being able to afford their websites. (No help for small businesses I hear your cry, and yes the rich get richer and the poor get poorer).

My health.

  • I am very depressed.
  • My OCD has spiraled off the ricker scale.
  • I have intrusive thoughts.
  • I have no patience.
  • I have panic attacks.
  • I hate noise, anything from traffic to car doors opening and closing.
  • The only way I will interact is online.
  • I do not answer my phone, which no doubt has cost me a lot of business.

So there is a knock-on domino effect when people are so robotic and irritating to the point if I could shove my fist down the other end of the line or across the computer screen, I would.

I am not in a good place right now because I am struggling to stay positive and optimistic. I have been studying neuroplasticity and I should stick with it because something I thought about, the next day materialized. Therefore I need to heal and start caring about myself rather than neglecting myself.

I plan to write a book about my life, this will no doubt open a can of worms, not only for me having to recall things that I would rather not remember but for the people that have done me wrong. My book will mention all the highs and lows and perhaps it may help people to avoid the same mistakes I made, in my relationships, and in my career, not only how everything over the years has affected my health and how I am trying to heal.

“I want to make a difference in this world and help people like me or worse off than me”.

I may not physically want to interact but a virtual connection I am fine with, although I won’t be doing anything for a few weeks because I need to recover from all the trauma I have had to endure over the last few months.

This all goes towards documenting my health so that it all gets put on the NHS database. There is a reason behind my madness.

It saddens me that the people I have reached out to on a personal level, who said they were going to get back in touch never have. I assume that they have reached their own conclusions and do not want to interact with someone that has disabilities. I suppose they see me as damaged goods, but labeling someone in such a way is not only hurtful but incorrect because we all have something going on in our lives thus we can all be labeled the same way. In fact, it will be hard to find a person that has not been screwed over in some way or another and how it affected them mentally. Usually, people who shy away from people with mental health disorders have their own demons to contend with and cannot handle yours. I do not see myself as damaged I see myself as someone who can overcome obstacles and then write about them. Just because I am having a bad day today does not mean I will be having a bad day tomorrow. No two days are the same. Yes, I have disabilities but there are millions of people in the same boat as me or worse off. You need to find the strength to make your story your superpower. Everyone has a book waiting to be written. There’s No Such Thing As Being “Damaged Goods” In A Relationship—Here’s Why (bolde.com)

I am like a bear with a sore head at the moment, as a consequence, I avoid talking over the phone as much as possible. When I do have to call people, as an example the other day, I nearly bit an IT engineer’s head off when I was having trouble accessing my site. I did apologize afterward about my outburst but I have a very short fuse and my temperament is not great, I can come off at times as being rude, (I try not to be, but cannot help it if people push my buttons). However, I also get very obnoxious, patronizing, and condescending individuals and all I want to do is punch their faces. I am no good at interacting physically, which is fortunate.

I have reported ‘British Gas’ to the Ombudsman and have to wait on an outcome. I feel very lethargic and am finding it hard to be optimistic right now. I should stay positive but is hard when I have to deal with some things that cause my health to worsen. It is as if I make one step forward and two steps back.

My OCD has gone through the roof and where I was making progress the last few months have basically thrown all my hard work away. Having a mental health disorder like depression which causes an onset of intrusive thoughts causing you to have compulsions to ease the anxiety. it is a vicious circle. and that is why I do not interact physically.

#onlinediary #onlinejournal #scripting #journalling #blogging #pip #depression #stress #anxiety #ocd #mental health #obsessivecompulsivedisorder

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