Under Breasts Boob Rash

A breast rash is usually an inflammation of the skin caused by irritation. The symptoms are redness and itchiness that usually occurs on the skin under the breasts. Breast rash may occur as a result of wearing tight clothing that is made from man-made material, or a bra that doesn’t fit well. It can also be because of heat and excessive sweating due to climate change or exercise and obesity.

Rashes may present themselves under the skin fold under the breast as well as other parts of the body such as cesarean apron flaps and may come in the form of scaling of the skin under the breasts, blisters, itchiness, and red patches.

Thankfully, there are many things you can do to soothe the itchiness and get rid of the rash.

Breast Anatomy

What causes rashes under the breast

Having a boob rash not only is uncomfortable it can also be embarrassing, knowing the causes, preventions, and treatments can eliminate the rash. Identifying the cause is the ultimate factor. It could be an allergy to detergent or the fiber of your garment, it could also be from excessive sweating.

Developing a rash under your breasts can be caused for a variety of reasons. The causes behind these rashes can range from natural skin responses to more serious disorders.

Causes generally fall into five categories:

  • allergies
  • infections
  • sweating
  • autoimmune disorders
  • cancer

Below we detail the main causes of rashes under the breasts, treatment options, and how to prevent the rashes from occurring.

  • food allergy
  • medications
  • insect bites
  • detergents
  • garment fiber
  • pollen
  • plants
  • pets

Infections

Wearing tight clingy clothing and environmental factors can cause women and men to sweat under their boobs, yes men also have man boobs if they are on the obese side. The warmth of our bodies can cause moisture on our skin under the breasts which is an ideal breeding ground for bacterial, fungal, and yeast infections.

Candidiasis

The moisture then acts like a petri dish for bacteria. This type of bacteria is known as candidiasis which results from the same yeasts, or fungi. A common cause of this bacteria can also be found in vaginal yeast infections, oral thrush infections, and diaper rash. Babies and adults alike can get infected. People suffering from autoimmune disorders and on medications such as antibiotics are more susceptible to infection.

The bacteria Candida thrives in moist, warm environments of skin folds, such as under the breasts or caesarian belly folds. This type of rash often develops into itchiness with uncomfortable blisters and small cracks.

In order to relieve the discomfort one should refrain from wearing tight clothes which are man-made. It is best to wear cotton and keep the area clean and dry. Try not to rub or scratch to alleviate the itchiness. It may be worth buying some cream over the counter such as Sudocrem. If this does not work after a few days you should reach out to a medical professional to get prescribed antifungal creams or oral drugs that treat candidiasis.

Recognizing what rash you have & Causes

Most breast rashes have the same causes as rashes occurring elsewhere on the body. Some rashes occur only on the breast.

Causes of rash that occur only on the breast may include:

  1. Breast abscess
  2. Inflammatory breast cancer
  3. Mammary duct ectasia
  4. Mastitis (an infection in breast tissue that most commonly affects women who are breast-feeding)
  5. Nipple dermatitis
  6. Paget’s disease of the breast

General causes of rash that can affect any part of the body, including the breast, include:

  1. Atopic dermatitis (eczema)
  2. Candidiasis (especially under the breasts)
  3. Cellulitis (a skin infection)
  4. Dermatitis
  5. Eczema
  6. Hives and angioedema
  7. Psoriasis
  8. Scabies
  9. Seborrheic dermatitis
  10. Shingles
  11. Ringworm
  12. Autoimmune Disorders
  13. Pemphigus Vulgaris 
  14. Hyperhidrosis
  15. Hailey-Hailey disease
  16. Cancer
  17. Heat Rash
  18. Hidradenitis Suppurativa

Ringworm

Contrary to belief ringworm has nothing to do with worms. Ringworm is a fungal infection called tinea.

These fungi cause ringworm and related skin conditions, such as athlete’s foot and jock itch.

The fungi are parasites that feed on dead keratin. Our skin, hair, and nails are made of keratin.

Ringworm has a distinctive appearance which has red patches of skin with a distinctive red ring.

Fungi cannot be seen with the naked eye they are microscopic, single-cell organisms that are present in the air, soil, water, animals, and the human body.

These types of skin conditions are highly contagious and can be spread through sharing towels, sheets, and showers.

People with athlete’s foot should not walk barefoot where other members of the household may walk on. It is also best to wear flip-flops in the shower to prevent germ cross-contamination.

Surprisingly you can even get it from your pets.

Autoimmune disorders

Autoimmune disorders such as Multiple Sclerosis can display symptoms of a rash, especially after treatment. Sometimes it could look like hives but in order cases, it can be a rash under the breast. Autoimmune disorders are chronic conditions that you cannot cure, but you can treat the symptoms.

Eczema

Eczema is a skin disorder that resembles patches of inflamed skin that is extremely itchy. Eczema is caused by irritating the inflammation which then develops small, fluid-filled bumps that ooze plasma and crust over.

Usually, steroids can sort out the problem. Leaving it untreated could lead to infection. Ezema can be found anywhere on your body, although it is the most common areas are:

  • face
  • hands
  • feet
  • behind the knees
  • the inner surface of the elbow

Eczema symptoms may be made worse by:

  • harsh soaps and detergents
  • wool
  • sweat
  • stress

Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a chronic disease of the immune system. Psoriasis can be recognized as smooth, discolored patches of skin in the folds of the body usually found under the breasts, armpits, and groin area. Unlike other types of psoriasis, inverse psoriasis does not have flaky skin.

Steroid creams and gels are usually prescribed for more mild cases of treatment for inverse psoriasis, however, for more severe cases the immune system may need to be suppressed.

Pemphigus Vulgaris

Pemphigus Vulgaris is an autoimmune skin disease that leads to blistering of the skin. Usually, older adults mainly are susceptible, and can appear anywhere on the skin.

Pemphigus Vulgaris can result in irritated patches and occur on the breast on the skin.

The exact cause of the condition is unknown, and treatment will typically be topical steroid corticosteroid creams and other immuno-suppressive drugs to lessen symptoms and avoid remission.

Hyperhidrosis

Hyperhidrosis is caused by overactive sweat glands producing more sweat than is needed to cool the body. A person has 2-4 million sweat glands and sweats up to a quart of fluid per day. Perspiration is a breeding ground for germs that cause infections. The cause of hyperhidrosis is unknown, but it tends to run in families.

To prevent sweating, we usually use antiperspirants under the breasts, which is not recommended as there are specific body antiperspirants made for this purpose, and some are even available in powder form. An alternative is to use a hyper-sensitive medicated talcum powder. If this does not do the job, your doctor may prescribe a more powerful antiperspirant.

Botox injections and the removal of sweat glands via laser or traditional surgery are options for severe cases.

Hailey-Hailey disease

Hailey-Hailey disease is a rare inherited disorder that results in a persistent, blistering rash.

This can occur under the breasts, or in other areas such as:

  • the neck
  • between the buttocks
  • in the armpits and groin

The rash tends to come and go spontaneously. Over time, the skin can become tough and dry and may develop painful cracks.

Normally steroid corticosteroid ointments and antibiotics are prescribed for treatment. Doctors may also recommend oral corticosteroids, photodynamic light therapy, or laser therapy in more severe cases.

If you are diagnosed with Hailey-Hailey disease, your doctor will advise you to avoid situations that make you sweat, such as not wearing tight clothing that is man-made and doesn’t permit air circulation, especially exerting in hot weather.

Cancer

Inflammatory breast cancer is a rare form of rapidly spreading cancer. Symptoms include:

  • breast skin discoloration
  • pitted skin
  • pimple-like rash
  • an inverted nipple that points inward rather than outward

This type of breast cancer is rare, however, it’s important to get yourself checked out by your doctor as quickly as possible if you have these symptoms.

A combination of chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation therapy is the standard treatment for inflammatory breast cancer.

Heat Rash

When we get hot we sweat and sometimes may develop a heat rash. A heat rash occurs when your sweat glands start overacting and may become blocked, this causes sweat pools under your skin, causing inflammation and a rash.

Wearing cotton-type clothing which is not tight and is able to cool off is an ideal remedy. Heat rash mainly happens when you sweat more profusely than normal because of climate and exercise including heat and humidity. Heat rash usually clears up without treatment.

Hidradenitis Suppuritiva

Blocked follicles are the primary cause of Hidradenitis Suppurativa which is a chronic skin condition that causes lesions and inflammation in the sweat glands.

Hidradenitis Suppuritiva can occur under the breasts and in other skin folds such as the armpits, groin, and anal regions. Mild cases can be treated with home remedies such as cold compresses and good hygiene practices.

When to see your doctor

There is never a bad time to contact your doctor when it comes to your health. If you notice unusual rashes and growths that do not go away on their own, you should get them checked out as quickly as possible. In fact, it is better to see a medical professional straight away rather than trying out home therapies. Never prolong treatment. A doctor can advise you on home therapy. The causes of rashes under the breast vary greatly in severity. Contact your doctor if you experience any of these symptoms alongside rashes:

  • You develop a fever, nausea, or vomiting.
  • The rash is extremely painful.
  • You see no improvement after using self-help measures for several days.
  • The rash has open sores that don’t heal.
  • You have symptoms of inflammatory breast cancer.

You should also see a doctor if, in addition to a rash, you have a chronic disease or compromised immune system.

Prevention

Preventing rashes from forming under your breasts can be done by wearing loose clothing that is not man-made and taking care of your personal hygiene, as well as wearing highly nonsensitive scented products.

Maintaining thorough personal hygiene may help reduce the risk of fungal infection. Making sure the skin under your breasts is clean and dry can help prevent yeast-based rashes. Regular washing with hypoallergenic products and not sharing towels or clothes may also help prevent symptoms such as ringworm.

You can also reduce the risk of allergic reactions by avoiding your known irritants and prevent heat rash by wearing loose-fitting clothes and staying cool in the heat.

When rashes under the breasts result from autoimmune diseases or cancer, treating the underlying condition is the best course of treatment and prevention.

How to Get Rid of a Rash Under Breasts

How is a rash under the breast treated?

A rash under the breast is rarely anything to worry about, in most cases, it is more of an annoyance that causes discomfort than anything else. However, identifying the underlying cause of the rash and treating will help to heal rashes heal within a short space of time.

Most treatments will involve keeping the affected area clean, dry, and free from irritants. Depending on the underlying causes of your rash, doctors may recommend anti-inflammatory or steroid creams, oral antibiotics, and other treatments.

Tips for relief

Tips to help treat symptoms of a rash.

  • If possible try to avoid wearing a bra as much as possible until the rash clears up.
  • When wearing a bra, make sure it is not made of man-made material and opt for a cotton material that does not have underwires or lace and fits without binding.
  • Stick a bra liner or mini panty liner pad to absorb moisture under the breasts.
  • Try putting paper tissue paper under the fold of the skin.
  • Opt to wear loose-fitting clothes made of fabrics that are not manmade that breathe, such as cotton and linen.
  • Avoid scented soaps, lotions, and moisturizers.
  • Soothe the area with a cool compress.
  • Apply calamine lotion can help reduce itching.
  • Hypoallergenic talcum powders can help soothe and prevent rashes from developing.
  • Avoid talcum powders that have corn starch as they can in fact worsen some rashes, especially if a yeast infection causes them.

Citation Credits: Rash Under Breast (Interigo): Causes, Treatment, and More (healthline.com)

Breast rash Causes – Mayo Clinic

Treatment – Treating a Rash At Home -Method 1

  • Consider applying a cold compress to the area to soothe the irritation. You can use cotton pads pre-soaked with cold water, this can help reduce inflammation and lead to an improvement in symptoms.
  • Try aloe vera gel
  • Consider applying cucumber slices to the affected area.
  • Alternatively, wrap the ice in a cotton towel or plastic bag. You could also use a bag of frozen peas wrapped in a towel. Keep in mind ice packs should not be applied directly to the skin. Apply the ice pack for 10 minutes at a time. Then, take a break and repeat as symptoms persist.
  • A face flannel cold compress is another option.
  • Never have hot baths or showers, try to have your baths as cool as possible.
  • Basil is an herb known for its homeopathic botanical properties that may help soothe skin. Crush fresh basil until they form a paste-like substance. You can add it to ice cubes or apply the paste directly onto your rash and let it dry. You should then the paste off with warm water and pat the area dry. Use this method once a day.
  • Alternative therapy such as homeopathic medicine does not work for everyone. If you notice this worsens your rash, do not repeat this method.
  • Consider if you have allergic reactions to home remedies before applying them to your skin.
  • Sometimes applying calamine lotion, aloe vera, or a fragrance-free moisturizer to the rash to the irritation can help to soothe the irritation. . Certain creams and moisturizers might help alleviate inflammation.
  • Calamine lotion known for soothing sunburn and chickenpox can prevent itching and irritation, mainly if the rash was caused by something like poison oak, ivy, or nettle stings. Use twice a day and apply with a cotton ball.
  • Aloe vera gel is a gel that has natural antifungal and antibacterial properties that can help a rash heal. Apply aloe vera gel to the affected area. You do not need to wipe it off but you should let it sit for about 20 minutes before getting dressed. Repeat as needed.
  • Fragrance-free moisturizers can be bought through most local drugstores or supermarkets. Make sure the moisturizer is unscented. Certain oils and perfumes used in scented lotions can make irritation worse. Try to go for brands that specifically focus on sensitive skin such as ‘clinique’ which is internationally renowned, although there are many other hypoallergenic brands on the market, you can also find good quality low-priced moisturizers from your local chemist, just ask your pharmacist.
  • Tea tree oil soothes skin rashes. Tea tree oil has antimicrobial properties, it should never be applied directly to the skin which could make problems worse. Always dilute tea tree oil in olive oil before use. Mix four tablespoons of olive oil with six drops of tea tree oil. Dip a cotton ball in the mixture and dab it gently on the affected area. Massage the affected area lightly for a few minutes to work the oil into your skin. For best results, do this after taking a bath or shower and again before going to bed. Some people may have sensitivities to tea tree oil. If you’ve never used it before, test it on a small area, like the inner part of your arm, to make sure it doesn’t irritate your skin. If you notice any irritation, or if your symptoms get worse in response to tea tree oil, cease use immediately.

Method 2Seeking Medical Care

  • When should you see a doctor? Most rashes under your breast are benign and caused by common skin conditions that will go away naturally without medical treatment. Breast rashes can occasionally be a symptom of more serious medical conditions, such as shingles, ringworm, or cancer.
  • Should your rash not respond to at-home treatment after a week or two, you should see a doctor. You should also see a doctor if your rash is accompanied by symptoms like fever, severe pain, sores that won’t heal, and worsening of symptoms.
  • Make an appointment with your local doctor to have the rash evaluated. Let them know if you’re experiencing any other symptoms in addition to the rash. Your doctor will probably want to examine the rash. If the rash is benign and you don’t have other symptoms, your doctor will be able to make a diagnosis without any further examination. However, for something more serious a skin scraping test sample may be ordered to check for a fungal infection. The doctor may also use a special lamp, known as a Wood’s lamp, to examine the skin further. In rare cases, a skin biopsy may be needed.
  • Try medications. If the rash is caused by an infection or does not clear up on its own, your doctor may recommend prescribed medicine. There are a variety of prescription meds used to treat skin rashes such as antibiotics or antifungal creams which you apply to the skin as directed by your doctor, as well as low-dose steroid hydrocortisone creams.

Method 3Making Lifestyle Changes

  • Always keep the underside of your breasts clean and dry. Moisture under the breasts can lead to skin infections and rashes.
  • When doing exercises such as running or going to the gym, pad the area with soft tissue or panty liners. Clean and dry the skin under your breast after workouts.
  • Consider using medicated talcum powder to keep the area dry.
  • Be aware of potential irritants, such as detergent, scented fabric softeners, and non-sensitive scented toiletries. It’s possible a certain product you’re using may be contributing to a skin rash.
  • Always do a patch test on the crease of your elbow when trying new products for the first time, this could include new soaps, shampoos, lotions, or fabric detergents.
  • Wear comfortable loose-fitting clothing and a bra that fits well. A bra that’s too big or too small could contribute to skin irritation that causes rashes on the breast. Wear cotton bras that use high-grade elastic materials. Avoid synthetic fabrics, as these can irritate the skin. It is worth going to a shop that measures bust sizes if you are unsure of your bra size and ask for a fitting.
  • Try wearing bras that do not have underwires if possible, or make sure they aren’t poking or irritating your skin. Wear fabrics such as cotton, linen, or silk, and avoid wool as that could be abrasive to the skin. Cotton fabrics can help reduce moisture under the breasts.

Final Thoughts From the Assistant Editor

Under Breast Boob Rash. Check your breasts often. If you spot an abnormality, rash, or growth no matter how small or a rash that won’t go away, it’s best to seek medical advice from your doctor or health professional. Get it checked out as soon as possible. It may be nothing, but it is worth having peace of mind.

#breastcancer #cancer #autoimmunedisease #lesions #breastrash #growths #boobrash #ringworm #psoriasis #heatrash #hives #skinfolds #skindisorders

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Zena is studying BA Hons Marketing Management at Cardiff Metropolitan University.

Zena may look normal to an untrained eye even though she has an invisible disability. Thanks to a great support network she is able to fit into society and can get additional help, whenever she needs it.

Zena aspires to be a role model for young people with Multiple Sclerosis.

Zena is also 'The Assistant Editor' of Disability UK Disabled Entrepreneur Journal, and Cymru Marketing Journal.

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