Disability UK Online Health Journal - All In One Business In A Box - Forum - Business Directory - Useful Resources

Category: Neuroplasticity (Page 1 of 2)

Neuroplasticity is the term used to describe brain remapping itself. It is when the brain has the capabilities to re-wire itself, also known as neural plasticity, or brain plasticity, and is the ability of neural networks in the brain to change through growth and reorganization. The changes range from individual neuron pathways making new connections, to systematic adjustments like cortical remapping.

Renata’s Story: Obsession To Liberation

Brown & Cream Image depicting wording typed on a typewriter with the words 'Renata's Online Journal'. Image Credit: PhotoFunia.com Category Vintage Typewriter.
Brown & Cream Image depicting wording typed on a typewriter with the words ‘Renata’s Online Journal’. Image Credit: PhotoFunia.com Category Vintage Typewriter.


DISCLAIMER

Trigger Warning: The content on this page includes material that may be distressing to some readers. Topics discussed may include sensitive issues such as trauma, violence, and other potentially triggering subjects. Reader discretion is advised. If you feel that you may be affected by these topics, please consider whether or not you wish to continue reading.

Additionally, some names have been changed to protect the true identities of the individuals involved.


This Is A True & Inspiring Story Of Renata a Disabled Entrepreneur, Editor, Published Author, OCD Sufferer & Caregiver

Renata MB Selfie
Renata M. Barnes Editor
(iRenata.com)

Celebrating Resilience: Navigating Life’s Challenges, overshadowed by the weight of adversity, Renata – The Editor of Disabled Entrepreneur – Disability UK Online Journal shines as a beacon of resilience and adaptation. Renata, an individual struggling with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and Cerebellar Atrophy, refused to let her condition define her. Instead, she forged a path to success as a businesswoman, author, and caregiver, demonstrating the transformative power of determination and innovation.

Renata’s journey began amidst the relentless grip of OCD, which cast even the simplest tasks as monumental challenges. Yet, rather than succumbing to despair, she harnessed her condition as a catalyst for growth. She cultivated meticulous attention to detail that would later propel her toward unparalleled achievements.

Renata’s journey has been marked by profound challenges and resilience. As a woman born in the UK to Polish immigrants, she has navigated the turbulent waters of discrimination racism, grief, and depression, encountering barriers that sought to confine her potential. Moreover, Renata is a survivor of domestic violence, battling not only the physical scars but also the psychological wounds inflicted by her abuser. Amidst the darkness, she found solace and strength in her entrepreneurial spirit.

Creating DisabledEntrepreneur.uk and DisabilityUK.co.uk initially as a form of self-help therapy, Renata transformed her pain into purpose, empowering herself and others. What began as a personal endeavor has blossomed into a beacon of hope and support for countless individuals. 

DisabledEntrepreneur.uk stands not only as a testament to Renata’s resilience but also as a vital community resource hub, providing information, solidarity, and empowerment to those facing similar challenges. Renata’s journey is a testament to the transformative power of resilience and the human spirit’s capacity to rise above adversity.

Renata is the owner and editor of multiple websites and offers a range of services for startups and disabled entrepreneurs. Renata is an expert in her field with over 30 years of experience. Renata’s services include Digital Marketing – SEO – Website Design – Content Writing – Video Creation – Graphic Design – Social Media Management.


Disabled Entrepreneur Business Card.

As she navigated the complexities of life’s challenges, she refused to be confined by the limitations imposed by her disabilities, OCD, Cerebellar AtrophyRheumatoid Arthritis & Dysphagia. She researched her conditions and adapted her life around her disabilities. Drawing upon her obsession with germs contamination, she developed a site to spread awareness about her illness (ocd.cymru) and campaign for mental health, disability discrimination, and human rights.

But her ambitions extended beyond the realm of entrepreneurship. With a keyboard at her fingertips, she has chronicled her journey. Her candid account of living with OCD struck a chord with many, offering solace and inspiration to those struggling with similar mental health challenges.

Despite her professional success, she was also drawn to caregiving. When her daughter was struck ill, she saw an opportunity to make a tangible difference in someone’s life. However, she recognized the need to establish clear boundaries to safeguard her well-being.

She approached caregiving with the same precision that defined her other endeavors. She understood the importance of maintaining her mental health while tending to the needs of others. When physical contact was necessary, she donned PPE clothing and disposable latex gloves, ensuring a barrier between herself and potential germs.

While some may view her precautions as excessive, they were instrumental in preserving her mental health and enabling her to fulfill her caregiving duties effectively. In the confines of her home, she navigated interactions with her daughter with grace and compassion.

Remarkably, her obsession with germ contamination proved to be a boon in her caregiving role. Her meticulous hygiene practices not only protected her but also safeguarded her immunosuppressed daughter from potentially harmful germs, such as listeriaHer vigilance served as a shield against illness, highlighting the invaluable role she played in preserving her daughter’s health.

Renata demonstrated an innate entrepreneurial spirit. She founded her own business, a marketing company specializing in content writing, digital marketing, website design, and lead generation. Through her keen editorial eye and passion for storytelling, Renata transformed her company into a beacon of inspiration for aspiring writers and readers alike.

But Renata’s ambitions did not stop there. Fueled by her insatiable curiosity and desire to effect positive change, she pursued a career as an editor, shaping the narratives of countless authors and amplifying voices that might otherwise go unheard. Her dedication to her craft earned her widespread acclaim within the health, literary community, and business world, establishing her as a formidable force in business.

As Renata’s journey continues to unfold, she remains steadfast in her commitment to making a difference in the world. With a burning passion for social justice and a desire to advocate for the rights of the marginalized, she is preparing to embark on a new chapter in her life – studying human rights law. Through her studies, Renata hopes to gain the knowledge and skills necessary to effect systemic change and promote equality and justice for all.

Renata’s story serves as a powerful reminder that adversity can be overcome and that with perseverance, determination, and a steadfast belief in oneself, anything is possible. As she continues to pursue her dreams and make her mark on the world, Renata inspires us all to embrace our passions, follow our hearts, and never stop striving for a better tomorrow.

Entrepreneurship to Advocacy – Standing Strong Against Discrimination and Championing Change”

In the face of disability discrimination, direct prejudice, racism, and ableism, Renata stands as a beacon of resilience and determination. Throughout her journey, she has encountered obstacles and challenges, yet she remains unfazed, and unwavering in her commitment to stand up for the rights of both her nation and herself. Despite facing discrimination and racism firsthand, Renata refuses to be silenced. Instead, she uses her experiences to fuel her advocacy efforts, speaking out against injustice and fighting for reform and change. As she continues on her path, Renata remains dedicated to challenging systemic discrimination and promoting equality and justice for all. Her journey serves as an inspiration to others, encouraging them to stand tall in the face of adversity and never waver in their pursuit of a better world. Renata’s legacy will be one of resilience, courage, and unwavering determination in the face of discrimination, leaving an indelible mark on the world and inspiring generations to come.

Renata’s history and disabilities do not define her and are simply stepping stones to her journey. Renata is in the midst of writing her autobiography, which she hopes to publish this year.

The True Story Renata, A Disabled Entrepreneur With OCD.

This story is an introduction bite-size teaser based on true events.

In a world where fear reigned supreme, Renata’s life was a constant battle against the invisible chains of OCD. Born into a home ruled by an obsessive fear of germs, her childhood was one of isolation and strict routines. Yet, this was only the beginning. Heartbreak, betrayal, and unimaginable trauma would follow her into adulthood, threatening to crush her spirit. But Renata was not one to be defeated. With resilience and determination, she transformed her darkest moments into a beacon of hope, rising from the ashes of her past to become a successful entrepreneur and a bestselling author. This is her story—a testament to the unyielding strength of the human spirit and the power of turning pain into purpose.


Possible Titles:

  1. OCD Unleashed: A Journey Through Shadows and Light
  2. OCD Uncensored: Breaking Free from the Chains of Fear
  3. Resilience Unbound: My Battle with OCD and Triumph Over Trauma
  4. From Obsession to Liberation: A Story of OCD and Redemption (I am inclined to use this title, albeit I could use these other titles as header titles for my chapters.).
  5. Behind Closed Doors: Living with OCD and Finding Freedom
  6. OCD Unveiled: Surviving the Storm and Embracing Hope
  7. Fear Unmasked: My Struggle with OCD and Path to Healing
  8. Through the Fire: Conquering OCD and Reclaiming My Life
  9. OCD Exposed: A Tale of Pain, Perseverance, and Victory
  10. Breaking the Cycle: Overcoming OCD and Discovering Strength

Obsession to Liberation Book Cover for Autobiography. Renata's Story.

Chapter 1: The Start Of Her Journey & Seeds of Fear

Born in Shrewsbury Shropshire to Polish immigrants and the firstborn, going to unfamiliar territory (school) at the tender age of five and not being able to speak the English language was frightening for a child who did not understand why her father had walked her to school and then left her there.

She did not know anyone and everything was scary. She remembers running home from school, crossing a busy main road by herself during school hours, and sprinting as fast as her legs could carry her. The following day her father dragged her to school as she screamed, making a scene not keen on wanting to go back. She remembered a few things in the school as she was pushed by the kids and spat on outside the school gates. She also remembered the time she was pushed down some steps in the playground face planting herself on the gravel. Another incident was when she was swinging on the apparatus and caught the corner of her eye from a sharp piece of metal protruding from the edge causing her to bleed, luckily for her, it was the corner of her eyelid and not her eye.

She also remembers the kids making fun of her and nobody wanted to play. She recalls the kids making her rub out the classroom number on a chalkboard only to get into trouble with the teacher. She also remembers in the main hall a teacher waving a watch in front of all the children and putting her arm up as she thought her teacher was giving away the watch only to be reprimanded the following day by the headteacher for stealing. To this day she does not know how her mother never noticed the watch in her blazer pocket that she checked each day for dirt. Renata believes her OCD is genetic as her mother had OCD, and so did her Grandmother as well as her Uncle, who would lay his handkerchief on a chair before sitting down.

At the age of five, she remembers the house she lived in and the regular visits from her godmother Kristina and her husband Sławek who was Renata’s godfather. She remembers her godmother buying a dress from the catalog in purple velvet with a gold satin bow. She remembers the parties her parents would have at Christmas and on Birthdays. She remembers her brother’s 1st birthday as he sat in his pram.

She also remembered visiting her family in Poland on her mother’s side where she ate Pierogi (a traditional Polish dish of potato and cheese dumplings) on her aunty’s side of the shared house where her grandmother and father lived with their daughter’s family, husband and children, and the dog chained to the barn called Sasek.

As the years went on, her aunt recalled a time they were in the poppy fields and when her aunt was not looking she sipped the sap (opium) from the poppy buds consequently sleeping solid for two days. Her aunt never told her sister, thus Renata’s mother never knew what had happened.

Renata lived her early years in a small, meticulously clean home. Her mother, consumed by an intense fear of germs, imposed strict rules that forbade friends from visiting. This isolation planted the first seeds of Renata’s obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), even though she didn’t realize it at the time. She found solace in writing short stories, reading books, and daydreaming, often imagining a life filled with friends and adventures.

Chapter 2: Heartbreak

At 21, Renata met Tristan a Banker, her true love. Their relationship blossomed quickly, filling the void of loneliness she had carried since childhood. However, their happiness was short-lived. Tistan’s infidelity shattered her world when he contracted an STD from exploring his sexuality. The repulsion she felt triggered her OCD, manifesting in compulsive handwashing and an aversion to mentioning his name. The breakup led to a nervous breakdown, leaving Renata emotionally scarred. She blamed her ex for many years for triggering her disability and causing her emotional distress.

Chapter 3: Escape to Paradise

Desperate for a fresh start, Renata moved to a holiday resort, securing a job that promised a new beginning. But paradise quickly turned into a nightmare. One night, three co-workers, high on drugs, sexually assaulted her. She reported it to the Resort CEO who did an internal investigation and the perpetrators contradicted what she said. Furthermore, if she had involved the Police this would have attracted bad publicity to the resort and the football club in which the resort CEO was the owner, consequently, she would also have lost her job. The trauma caused her OCD to flare up with a vengeance, plunging her into a deep depression. The domino effect of events including an accident where she had to have stitches only amplified her OCD even more.

Chapter 4: Knight in Shining Armor

Amidst the darkness, Alan, the resort’s security manager, became her beacon of hope. His kindness and support helped her regain some semblance of normalcy. Their bond grew stronger, and eventually, they married. Yet, happiness was fleeting. Two days after their wedding, Renata received a call from an anonymous woman demanding to speak with Alan. Suspicion gnawed at her, but she chose to trust her husband.

Chapter 5: Building Dreams and Shattered Trust

Together, they started a security business. Renata poured her heart and soul into it, while Alan preferred to stay in a managerial role, leaving the financial responsibilities to her. Despite her naivety, the business thrived for three years until £120K went missing. Pregnant and six months along, Renata’s world crumbled when Alan left her for the mysterious caller from their honeymoon.

Chapter 6: Rising from Ruins

Heartbroken and on the business on the brink of collapse, Renata’s OCD resurfaced, paralyzing her with fear. With her daughter’s birth, she found solace in the support of her mother and friends. However, tragedy struck again when both her parents and brother died in quick succession. Overwhelmed by grief, Renata decided to restart her business alone, this time moving away from security and focusing on marketing and website design. It became her lifeline, giving her a purpose and a path to financial stability.

Chapter 7: Love and Betrayal

Years later, she met an Eastern European immigrant who seemed to be the answer to her prayers. But his charm masked a darker side. His hatred and anger escalated with emotional and physical abuse. Through perseverance, she managed to get him to leave her alone and was thankful that he had gone back home to his motherland but there was an element of fear that lingered what if he returned, what if he came back to finish what he started?

Chapter 8: Violated Sanctuary

While traveling abroad for a much-needed break from the turmoil of her life, Received received a call that would shatter her fleeting sense of peace. Her home, her sanctuary, had been violated by a ruthless robbery. The intruder had ransacked every room, leaving behind a trail of contamination that her mind could not cleanse. Precious, irreplaceable mementos of her family and her past were stolen, amplifying her sense of loss and betrayal. Overwhelmed by the intrusion and the thought of her sacred space being tainted, Renata’s OCD flared up with a vengeance. She confined herself to a single, meticulously cleaned area of her home, unable to venture beyond its self-imposed quarantine. This invasion, both physical and emotional, pushed her deeper into the grip of her disorder, undoing the fragile progress she had made. Renata’s OCD returned, turning her into a recluse once more.

Chapter 9: Writing Her Own Story

Some of this part needs to materialize as it has not happened yet.

  • I have started writing
  • I have a lot of followers and connections
  • I have started writing my autobiography

Determined not to let her past or OCD defeat her, Renata turned to writing. Pouring her pain and experiences into words, she authored a memoir. The book resonated with millions, becoming a bestseller. Renata’s story of resilience and survival inspired countless others, transforming her into a beloved author.

Epilogue: The Phoenix Rises

Renata stood at the window of her cozy home, watching her daughter in the garden. The shadows of her past still lingered, yet she continued with her quest to write a new chapter of her life through sheer determination and the power of storytelling,


Blue Butterfly

Exploring the Link Between Cannabis And Subjective Cognitive Decline



Exploring the Link Between Cannabis Use and Reduced Likelihood of Subjective Cognitive Decline

Cannabis legalization has gained momentum across the globe, and there has been a surge in research examining its potential effects on health and cognition. One particularly intriguing finding is the association between cannabis use and a lower likelihood of experiencing subjective cognitive decline (SCD). SCD refers to self-reported concerns about changes in cognitive function that are not necessarily detected by formal testing. While this relationship may seem counterintuitive given some common perceptions about cannabis and cognitive function, emerging evidence suggests a more nuanced understanding.

Understanding Subjective Cognitive Decline: Subjective cognitive decline involves an individual’s perception of their cognitive abilities. It may manifest as forgetfulness, difficulty concentrating, or other cognitive symptoms that impact daily life. Importantly, SCD does not always correlate with objective measures of cognitive impairment, such as those obtained through neuropsychological testing. However, it can serve as an early warning sign of potential cognitive decline, including conditions like Alzheimer’s disease.

The Cannabis Conundrum: Cannabis is commonly associated with cognitive impairments, particularly in heavy or long-term users. This association stems from the psychoactive effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive compound in cannabis, which can temporarily impair memory, attention, and other cognitive functions. However, the relationship between cannabis use and cognitive decline is complex and multifaceted.

Recent Findings: Surprisingly, recent research has suggested a potential protective effect of cannabis against subjective cognitive decline. A study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease in 2020 found that cannabis use was associated with a lower likelihood of experiencing SCD among older adults. The researchers analyzed data from the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center and found that individuals who reported using cannabis had reduced odds of self-reported cognitive decline compared to non-users.

Furthermore, a longitudinal study published in the journal Neurology in 2019 followed a cohort of middle-aged adults for over 25 years. The researchers found that cannabis users did not experience a greater decline in cognitive function compared to non-users over time. In fact, they observed a trend suggesting that cannabis use was associated with slightly better cognitive performance in some domains.

Mechanisms and Hypotheses: The reasons behind the apparent protective effect of cannabis on subjective cognitive decline are not yet fully understood. However, researchers have proposed several hypotheses:

  1. Neuroprotective Effects: Some cannabinoids, such as cannabidiol (CBD), have demonstrated neuroprotective properties in preclinical studies. These compounds may help mitigate the neuroinflammation and oxidative stress associated with cognitive decline.
  2. Enhanced Brain Plasticity: Cannabinoids may promote neuroplasticity, the brain’s ability to reorganize and form new neural connections. This could potentially offset age-related cognitive decline and maintain cognitive function.
  3. Symptom Management: Cannabis may alleviate symptoms such as anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbances, which are common contributors to subjective cognitive decline. By improving overall well-being, cannabis users may perceive their cognitive function more positively.
  4. Selection Bias: It’s also possible that individuals who choose to use cannabis are inherently different from non-users in ways that protect against cognitive decline. For example, they may have healthier lifestyles or genetic factors that contribute to cognitive resilience.

Future Directions: While these findings are intriguing, more research is needed to fully elucidate the relationship between cannabis use and cognitive decline. Longitudinal studies with larger sample sizes and diverse populations are necessary to confirm these associations and better understand the underlying mechanisms.

Additionally, researchers must consider various factors that may influence the effects of cannabis on cognition, including the type of cannabis used, dosage, frequency of use, age of onset, and co-occurring health conditions. Standardized measures of cannabis use and cognitive function will also facilitate comparisons across studies.

Conclusion:

The relationship between cannabis use and subjective cognitive decline is a topic of growing interest and debate in the scientific community. While conventional wisdom might suggest that cannabis use would exacerbate cognitive decline, emerging evidence suggests a more complex picture. While more research is needed to fully understand the mechanisms underlying this association, these findings challenge existing perceptions and highlight the need for further investigation into the potential therapeutic effects of cannabis on cognitive function. As cannabis legalization continues to expand, it is essential to explore both the potential benefits and risks associated with its use, particularly concerning cognitive health.

Citations


#cannabis #thc #cognitivefunction #cognitivehealth #brainplasticity #neuroprotectiveeffects #scd #cannabidiol #cbd #hemp


Disability UK Content Writing Services Logo

Neuralink’s First Human Trial Patient

Brain Chip Domain Name For Sale
Domain Name For Sale – Contact US Today! (Ref S.S)


Exploring the Frontiers of Neuroscience Pave the Way for a Revolutionary Future

Neurolink, the brainchild of visionary entrepreneur Elon Musk, has captured the imagination of the world with its ambitious quest to merge the human brain with artificial intelligence. Central to this endeavor are the pioneering experiments conducted on monkeys and pigs, offering tantalizing glimpses into a future where the boundaries between mind and machine blur, and the possibilities for human enhancement seem limitless.

The foundation of Neurolink’s research lies in its exploration of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs), devices that enable direct communication between the brain and computers. By leveraging cutting-edge technology, including ultra-thin electrodes and advanced neural recording and stimulation techniques, the company aims to unlock the full potential of the human brain and revolutionize the way we interact with technology.

In recent years, Neurolink has garnered attention for its experiments involving non-human primates, specifically macaque monkeys. In one notable study, monkeys were trained to play a simple video game using only their thoughts, with electrodes implanted in their brains providing real-time feedback to a computer interface. The results were nothing short of astonishing, demonstrating the remarkable adaptability of the brain and the potential for seamless integration between biological and artificial systems.

Similarly, Neurolink’s experiments on pigs have offered valuable insights into the safety and efficacy of its brain implants. In a groundbreaking demonstration, pigs implanted with Neurolink devices showcased the ability to detect and transmit neural signals associated with various sensory experiences, ranging from touch to smell. This milestone not only underscored the versatility of Neurolink’s technology but also hinted at its potential to enhance sensory perception and cognition in humans.

Beyond the realm of scientific curiosity, Neurolink’s experiments hold profound implications for the future of humanity. Imagine a world where individuals with paralysis can regain mobility through thought-controlled prosthetics, where people with neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s can receive targeted stimulation to alleviate symptoms, or where individuals with sensory impairments can augment their perception of the world through digital enhancements.

The vision driving Neurolink extends far beyond mere technological innovation; it represents a fundamental reimagining of what it means to be human. By bridging the gap between biology and technology, the company seeks to empower individuals to transcend the limitations of their physical bodies and unlock new realms of cognitive potential.

Of course, the path to realizing this vision is fraught with challenges and ethical considerations. The prospect of directly interfacing with the human brain raises thorny questions about privacy, autonomy, and the potential for misuse or abuse of this technology. As Neurolink continues to push the boundaries of neuroscience, it must do so with careful deliberation and a steadfast commitment to ethical principles.

Despite these challenges, the promise of Neurolink’s technology is too tantalizing to ignore. With each passing experiment, the company moves closer to a future where the line between science fiction and reality blurs, and where the human mind becomes the ultimate frontier of exploration. Whether this future unfolds as a utopian dream or a dystopian nightmare remains to be seen, but one thing is certain: Neurolink’s journey is reshaping our understanding of what it means to be human, and the possibilities it holds are as awe-inspiring as they are profound.

Meet Noland Arbaugh: Neuralink’s First Human Trial Patient

In a groundbreaking leap forward in neurotechnology, Neuralink, the brain-computer interface company founded by Elon Musk, has initiated its first-ever human trial. At the center of this historic endeavor is Noland Arbaugh, a former athlete whose life took a dramatic turn eight years ago when a diving accident at a children’s camp left him paralyzed. Arbaugh’s journey from tragedy to hope embodies the promise of cutting-edge innovation in the field of neuroscience.

At the age of 29, Arbaugh has faced challenges that most can scarcely imagine. Once an active and vibrant individual with a passion for sports, his world changed irreversibly on that fateful day. Despite the devastating impact of his injury, Arbaugh’s spirit remained unbroken, and his resilience became an inspiration to many.

The decision to participate in Neuralink’s human trial was not one made lightly. For Arbaugh, it represented an opportunity not only to potentially regain control over his body but also to contribute to the advancement of science in a profound and meaningful way. His courage and determination underscore the importance of pushing the boundaries of what is possible in the realm of medical technology.

Neuralink’s ambitious goal is to develop implantable brain-machine interfaces that can enable individuals with neurological conditions to control computers and other devices directly with their thoughts. By bridging the gap between the human brain and artificial intelligence, the company aims to revolutionize communication, mobility, and quality of life for people like Arbaugh.

The procedure involved implanting a small device, known as the Neuralink implant, into Arbaugh’s brain. This device, equipped with ultra-thin electrodes, is designed to detect and stimulate neural activity with unprecedented precision. Through a wireless connection, the implant communicates with external devices, allowing for bidirectional communication between the brain and the digital world.

While the potential applications of Neuralink’s technology are vast, the primary focus of the initial trials is on restoring mobility and independence to individuals with paralysis. For Arbaugh, who has spent years adapting to life in a wheelchair, the prospect of regaining even a fraction of his former capabilities is nothing short of miraculous.

The road ahead is not without its challenges. Neuralink’s human trials represent uncharted territory, with countless complexities and uncertainties to navigate. Ethical considerations, safety concerns, and technical limitations all loom large as researchers strive to translate cutting-edge science into real-world solutions.

Yet, despite the inherent risks and uncertainties, Arbaugh remains undeterred. His participation in the trial is driven not only by personal ambition but also by a deep-seated belief in the transformative power of technology to change lives. By lending his voice to this pioneering endeavor, he hopes to pave the way for a future where disabilities need not define one’s destiny.

As Neuralink’s first human trial patient, Arbaugh finds himself at the forefront of a revolution in neurotechnology. His journey symbolizes the convergence of human ingenuity and indomitable spirit in the pursuit of a better tomorrow. While the road ahead may be long and arduous, Arbaugh’s unwavering resolve serves as a beacon of hope for countless individuals whose lives hang in the balance.

In the annals of scientific history, Noland Arbaugh’s name will forever be etched as the first-ever human trial patient—a trailblazer who dared to defy the limits of possibility and embrace the unknown. As Neuralink continues to push the boundaries of what is achievable, Arbaugh’s story will serve as a reminder of the boundless potential that lies within the human spirit. Citation: Who is Neuralink’s first ever human trial patient? Former athlete Noland Arbaugh, 29, was left paralyzed after a diving accident at a children’s camp eight years ago | Daily Mail Online

“Exploring Brain Interfaces: Neuralink and Neuroplasticity in Neuroscience”

Neuralink and neuroplasticity represent distinct yet interconnected aspects of neuroscience. Neuralink, pioneered by Elon Musk, focuses on developing advanced brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) that directly connect the human brain with external devices, aiming to augment cognitive abilities, restore lost functions, and even merge human intelligence with artificial intelligence. In contrast, neuroplasticity refers to the brain’s remarkable ability to reorganize and adapt its structure and function in response to experiences, learning, and environmental changes. While Neuralink harnesses technology to interface with the brain externally, neuroplasticity highlights the brain’s intrinsic capacity for self-repair and adaptation, offering insights into how the brain can naturally rewire itself to overcome challenges, recover from injuries, and optimize performance. Thus, while Neuralink seeks to enhance and augment brain function through external intervention, neuroplasticity underscores the inherent resilience and adaptability of the brain itself.


#neuralink #elonmusk #mindcontrol #neuroscience #neurotechnology #nolandarbaugh #paralysis #neuroplasticity #BMI #brainmachine #ai #augmentbrain #brainrepair #brainrewire #neurons #brainchipsuk


Disability UK Content Writing Services Logo

How to Use Neuroplasticity to Manifest Your Business Goals 



How to Use Neuroplasticity to Manifest Your Business Goals 

Adaptability and growth are the cornerstones of business success. But did you know your brain holds the key to achieving your most ambitious business goals? The reason for it is neuroplasticity—a fascinating concept that allows us to rewire our brains, fostering adaptability, creativity, and resilience. You can use neuroplasticity to manifest your business goals and make them more than just aspirations. So, let’s see how you can transform your business aspirations into tangible achievements.  

Understanding Neuroplasticity  

In business, challenges and opportunities often walk hand in hand. When you’re starting your business as a disabled person, you’ll face unique hurdles but also amazing possibilities and opportunities; because of that, understanding neuroplasticity becomes not just an advantage but a necessity. 

So, what is neuroplasticity? It refers to the brain’s remarkable ability to reorganize itself by forming new neural connections throughout life. In simple terms, neuroplasticity is like your brain’s ability to learn and adapt. When you learn something new or face a challenge, your brain creates new connections between its cells, allowing you to adjust, improve, and even recover from injuries. 

It’s like upgrading your brain’s software to become better at what you do, and this process continues throughout your life. Understanding neuroplasticity means realizing you can shape your brain’s abilities by practicing, learning, and embracing new experiences. 

For entrepreneurs, this means that how you think, perceive, and adapt to challenges is not fixed but malleable. So, although starting your business as a disabled person may present initial challenges, it also offers numerous benefits, such as enhanced problem-solving skills, creativity, and resilience.  

A woman playing chess. 
Neuroplasticity helps you rewire your mindset.
Image Credit

Setting Clear Business Goals 

When starting a business, particularly one that caters to the needs of individuals with disabilities, having crystal-clear goals is essential. You have to consider various resources as well as funding for your business idea. Investors and funding organizations look for entrepreneurs with a clear vision and a roadmap for achieving it. So, your goals should be SMART. 

SMART goals are Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-bound objectives that provide a clear and structured framework for your business ambitions. When you set SMART goals, your brain responds by engaging in cognitive processes that enhance your problem-solving skills and adaptability. 

The specificity of SMART goals forces your brain to focus on precise outcomes and encourages it to create new neural connections related to those specific tasks. Measurability allows you to track progress, providing a sense of accomplishment that triggers the brain’s reward system. Achievability pushes your brain to explore innovative solutions. Relevance keeps your brain engaged by aligning goals with your business’s overall vision. Finally, time-bound goals create a sense of urgency and prompt your brain to prioritize and adapt efficiently. 

To set effective business goals, break them into smaller, actionable steps, regularly review progress, and adjust them as needed. This approach helps you to use neuroplasticity to manifest your business goals. 

Positive Visualization Techniques 

Visualization is one of the best strategies to use neuroplasticity to manifest your business goals. This technique allows your brain to create new neural pathways by vividly imagining the achievement of your entrepreneurial dreams. Here are some different visualization methods you can use: 

  • Guided Imagery: In guided imagery, you vividly imagine a scenario related to your business success. Picture the details: the sights, sounds, and emotions.  
  • Vision Boards: Create a vision board by collecting images, words, and symbols representing your business aspirations. This visual representation serves as a constant reminder of your goals. 
  • Mental Rehearsal: Like athletes mentally rehearse their performance, visualize your business success in advance. Imagine yourself confidently pitching your product, closing deals, or overcoming challenges. This rehearsal primes your brain for success when faced with real situations.  
  • Positive Self-Talk: Incorporate positive affirmations into your daily routine. Repeating phrases like “I am capable of achieving my business goals” can reshape your neural pathways, increasing self-confidence and resilience.  
  • Gratitude Journaling: Reflect on your business achievements and express gratitude for them. Acknowledging your successes, no matter how small, activates the brain’s reward system, motivating you to pursue more significant accomplishments.  
A woman journaling. 
Gratitude journaling is a good way to use neuroplasticity to manifest your business goals.
 Image Credit

To illustrate visualization effectiveness, consider the story of Number 1 Movers Canada, a moving company that used positive visualization to transform its business. They regularly practiced positive visualization, envisioning seamless moves, satisfied customers, and business expansion. This mental rehearsal significantly boosted team morale and problem-solving abilities. As a result, the company improved customer satisfaction ratings and expanded its operations, becoming a prominent player in the Canadian moving industry. 

Embracing Failure and Learning  

Embracing failure and learning from setbacks is vital to using neuroplasticity for business success. Instead of fearing failures, consider them as stepping stones toward growth. Neuroplasticity allows your brain to adapt, evolve, and overcome obstacles. 

By acknowledging that failures are not dead-ends but opportunities for improvement, you unlock your brain’s potential to rewire and innovate. For example, a tech startup faced initial product glitches but overcame fear, reevaluated its approach, and refined its offerings. They ultimately thrived by incorporating customer feedback and adapting swiftly. So, failure can help you overcome your fears and achieve your business goals. 

Consistent Mindfulness Practices 

Integrating consistent mindfulness practices can be a game-changer for leveraging neuroplasticity to achieve your goals. Mindfulness involves staying present, focused, and non-judgmental in your daily activities. As a result, it fosters a conducive environment for your brain’s adaptability. 

Mindfulness practices enhance your brain’s neuroplasticity by reducing stress and improving cognitive functions. For instance, a business leader faced with mounting pressure and deadlines decided to embrace mindfulness. Daily meditation and mindfulness exercises will reduce stress and sharpen their decision-making skills and creativity. Here are a few techniques you might benefit from: 

  • Morning Meditation: Begin your day with a brief meditation to clear your mind and set a positive tone. 
  • Mindful Breathing: Take short breaks throughout the day to focus on deep, mindful breaths, reducing stress and improving focus. 
  • Walking Meditation: Practice mindfulness while walking, paying attention to each step and your surroundings. 
  • Technology Breaks: Dedicate tech-free moments to recharge and stay present. 
A calming image of the ocean with stones stacked upon each other. 
Meditation and mindfulness help you clear your head and focus. 
Image Credit

Rewire Your Brain for Business Success 

As you may see, with a bit of effort and know-how, you can use neuroplasticity to manifest your business goals. By setting clear and SMART goals, practicing positive visualization, embracing mindfulness, and learning from setbacks, you can reshape your brain’s pathways for success. Nurture your adaptability and watch your entrepreneurial dreams become reality. 


#neuroplasticity #manifestation #goals #journalling #businesssuccess #meditation #gratitude #visualisation #visionboards #hypnosis


Blue Butterfly Logo

Coping With Rejection

Coping With Rejection

I suffer from cognitive impairment and when I received an email from a famous mental health magazine at first, I thought they had accepted my submission, however, in reality, they said they had received my pitch, not that they had accepted it.

A couple of hours go by and I get a second email saying they had declined my submission, my heart sank as I read the email although I should be flattered that they think my proposal was aimed at professionals rather than the general public. I do not sway much with my writing, so I believe my writing is of a high standard.

I did not actually give a proposal I just cited three articles I have published on this site.

Rejection Email

Remove Negativity

I have proceeded to remove any backlinks I have for this magazine, because if they do not support me why should I support them? I have redacted their name so that I do not give them any publicity.

Coping with rejection as an entrepreneur

Being an entrepreneur can be a rollercoaster ride of highs and lows. One of the most challenging aspects of being an entrepreneur is coping with rejection. Whether it’s a pitch to an investor that falls flat, a sales call that doesn’t lead to a sale or a product launch that doesn’t go as planned, rejection can be difficult to handle. However, rejection is a natural part of the entrepreneurial journey, and it’s important to learn how to cope with it in a healthy way. In this article, we’ll explore some tips for coping with rejection as an entrepreneur.

  1. Reframe rejection as a learning opportunity

The first step in coping with rejection is to reframe it as a learning opportunity. Instead of seeing rejection as a personal failure, try to view it as a chance to learn and improve. Ask yourself questions like, “What could I have done differently?” or “What can I learn from this experience?” By approaching rejection with a growth mindset, you can turn it into a positive experience that helps you grow as an entrepreneur.

  1. Practice self-compassion

Entrepreneurship can be a tough and lonely road, and rejection can take a toll on your self-esteem. It’s important to practice self-compassion and treat yourself with kindness and understanding. Recognize that rejection is a normal part of the entrepreneurial journey and that it doesn’t define your worth as a person or an entrepreneur. Be gentle with yourself and take time to do things that make you feel good, like exercise, spend time with loved ones, or engage in a hobby.

  1. Seek support from others

Don’t be afraid to reach out for support from others when coping with rejection. Whether it’s a trusted mentor, a supportive friend, or a business coach, having someone to talk to can help you process your emotions and gain perspective. Surround yourself with people who believe in you and your vision, and who can offer encouragement and support during challenging times.

  1. Take action

After experiencing rejection, it’s important to take action and keep moving forward. Don’t dwell on the rejection or let it hold you back. Instead, use it as motivation to improve and keep pushing forward. Take action on the feedback you received and use it to make improvements to your pitch, product, or approach. Remember that rejection is not the end of the road, but rather a bump in the road on your entrepreneurial journey.

  1. Keep things in perspective

Finally, it’s important to keep things in perspective when coping with rejection. Remember that rejection is a natural part of the entrepreneurial journey and that it doesn’t define your success or your future as an entrepreneur. Keep your eye on the big picture and focus on your long-term goals, rather than getting bogged down by short-term setbacks.

Conclusion

Coping with rejection as an entrepreneur is never easy, but it’s an important skill to develop. By reframing rejection as a learning opportunity, practicing self-compassion, seeking support from others, taking action, and keeping things in perspective, you can navigate the ups and downs of entrepreneurship with resilience and grace. Remember that rejection is not a reflection of your worth as a person or an entrepreneur, but rather an opportunity to grow and improve. Keep pushing forward and stay focused on your vision, and success will follow.

Rejection can cause anxiety and depression and can lead to procrastination as well as imposter syndrome. In order to combat this one needs to rewire our thoughts into positive thinking. Never let anything get to you. Do not dwell on why it happened, instead move quickly on to something else, the lesson learned is (in my case) that it is their loss because now they have lost a whole bunch of backlinks, which are like gold dust in the digital marketing world of search engine optimization.

Build your own kingdom and be the king/queen of your own castle”.

ADVERTISEMENT

If you found my writing helpful and want similar content on your site just drop me a message via our online form below.

Cymru Marketing Banner AD

#rejection #undertandingbehaviour #entepreneurs #anxiety #stress #depression #coping #contentwriting #digitalmarketing #backlinks

The Law Of Attraction & Manifestation

The Law Of Attraction & Manifestation

The Law of Attraction and Manifestation: A Guide to Creating Your Reality

The Law of Attraction and Manifestation are two concepts that have gained widespread popularity in recent years, particularly within the self-help and personal development spheres. At their core, both the Law of Attraction and Manifestation are based on the idea that we can create our reality by using our thoughts and intentions to attract what we want into our lives. In this article, we’ll explore what the Laws of Attraction and Manifestation are, how they work, and some tips for using them to create the life you desire.

What is the Law of Attraction?

The Law of Attraction is the idea that like attracts like. In other words, our thoughts and emotions have a vibrational frequency that attracts similar energies to us. This means that if we think positive thoughts and feel positive emotions, we will attract positive experiences and circumstances into our lives. Conversely, if we think negative thoughts and feel negative emotions, we will attract negative experiences and circumstances.

The Law of Attraction is based on the principle that everything is energy and that we are all connected. Our thoughts and emotions are powerful energy that we can use to attract what we want into our lives. This means that if we focus on what we want, rather than what we don’t want, we will attract more of what we desire.

What is Manifestation?

Manifestation is the act of bringing something into existence through our thoughts and intentions. It is the process of creating our reality by aligning our thoughts, emotions, and actions with what we want to experience. Manifestation is based on the idea that we have the power to create our reality and that our thoughts and intentions are the driving force behind that creation.

How do the Law of Attraction and Manifestation work together?

The Law of Attraction and Manifestation work together to create our reality. The Law of Attraction is the principle that governs the attraction of energy, while Manifestation is the process of consciously directing that energy toward a desired outcome. When we use the Law of Attraction and Manifestation together, we are aligning our thoughts, emotions, and actions with our desires, and creating the conditions for those desires to manifest in our lives.

Tips for using the Law of Attraction and Manifestation

Here are some tips for using the Law of Attraction and Manifestation to create the life you desire:

  1. Get clear on what you want – Before you can manifest your desires, you need to be clear on what they are. Take some time to think about what you truly want in life, and be specific. The more specific you are, the easier it will be to focus your thoughts and intentions on that desire.
  2. Visualize your desires – A visualization is a powerful tool for manifestation. Take some time each day to visualize yourself experiencing your desired outcome. See yourself living the life you want, and feel the emotions associated with that experience.
  3. Use positive affirmations – Affirmations are statements that affirm our desired outcome. Use positive affirmations to reinforce your belief in your ability to manifest your desires. Repeat your affirmations daily, and use them to counter any negative thoughts or beliefs that may arise.
  4. Take action – Manifestation is not just about thinking and feeling, it also requires action. Take inspired action towards your goals, and be open to opportunities that come your way. When you take action, you are signaling to the universe that you are ready to receive your desires.
  5. Trust the process – Trust that the universe is working in your favor and that your desires are on their way to you. Let go of any doubts or fears, and have faith that everything is happening as it should.

The Law of Attraction and Manifestation are powerful tools for manifestation

The Law of Attraction and Manifestation are powerful tools that have gained significant popularity in recent years. These principles posit that our thoughts and beliefs have a direct impact on the circumstances and experiences we attract into our lives. While some may dismiss these ideas as mere wishful thinking, there is growing evidence that suggests that these principles can have a significant impact on our lives. In this article, we’ll explore why the Law of Attraction and Manifestation are powerful tools in manifestation.

Firstly, the Law of Attraction and Manifestation is grounded in the idea that everything in the universe is made up of energy, including our thoughts and emotions. This means that the thoughts and feelings we put out into the universe can have a direct impact on the energy around us. This energy can then attract similar energy back to us, resulting in the manifestation of our desires.

For example, if we focus on positive thoughts and emotions, we are more likely to attract positive experiences and circumstances into our lives. On the other hand, if we focus on negative thoughts and emotions, we are more likely to attract negative experiences and circumstances. This is because our thoughts and emotions have a vibrational frequency, and the universe responds to this frequency by bringing us experiences that match it.

Secondly, the Law of Attraction and Manifestation can be a powerful tool for goal setting and achieving. By focusing our thoughts and emotions on our goals, we are more likely to attract the resources and opportunities we need to achieve them. This is because the universe responds to our thoughts and emotions by bringing us experiences and opportunities that align with them.

If we set a goal to start our own business, and we focus our thoughts and emotions on the success and abundance that this business will bring, we are more likely to attract the resources and opportunities we need to make it a reality. This could include finding investors, connecting with potential customers, or discovering new markets for our product or service.

Thirdly, the Law of Attraction and Manifestation can help us to overcome limiting beliefs and negative thought patterns. Often, we hold limiting beliefs about ourselves and our ability to achieve our goals, which can prevent us from taking action or making progress toward them. By focusing our thoughts and emotions on positive outcomes and possibilities, we can begin to shift our beliefs and overcome the mental barriers that are holding us back.

By having a limiting belief that we are not good enough to start our own business, we can use the Law of Attraction and Manifestation to shift our focus toward positive outcomes and possibilities. We can visualize ourselves running a successful business, attracting customers, and making a positive impact in our industry. By focusing on these positive outcomes, we can begin to shift our beliefs and overcome the mental barriers that are holding us back.

Conclusion

The Law of Attraction and Manifestation are powerful tools that can help us to achieve our goals, overcome limiting beliefs, and attract positive experiences and circumstances into our lives. By focusing our thoughts and emotions on positive outcomes and possibilities, we can harness the power of the universe to manifest our desires and create the life we want to live. While these principles may not be a one-size-fits-all solution for everyone, they are worth exploring for anyone who is looking to make positive changes in their life.

Advertisement – Writing Content!


Health Content Writing Banner Ad

#lawofattraction #manifestation #visualization #journaling #meditation #hypnosis #thoughts #subconsious #mind #brainwaves #esp #energy #affirmations


Blue Butterfly

Stress & Depression are the root cause of OCD.

Up to ½ million people in the UK have work-related stress often resulting in illness. Up to 5 million people in the UK are ‘very’ or ‘extremely’ stressed through work. ‘Stress, depression, and anxiety are the second most commonly reported work-related illnesses. https://www.stressuless.com/stress.html

Stress & Depression are the root cause of OCD.

Depression may be related to the personal stress developed at home or work. Depression may result after the onset of OCD as in the article below but Depression can also be the result of traumatic events in a person’s life such as Grief which causes a Domino Effect.

Renata’s Online Journal Health Update.

I will talk about 5 things relating to me and how they are impacting my life and what I am doing in terms of therapy.

  • Stress
  • Anxiety
  • OCD
  • Intrusive Thoughts
  • Depression

Stress

I am under a tremendous amount of stress for the following reasons:

  1. I have an ongoing dispute with British Gas and it is currently being investigated by the ombudsman.
  2. I have clients dropping like flies because they no longer can afford to pay for their websites due to the price rises of the cost of living.
  3. I am concerned about the stability of a brand new computer that the manufacturer refused to replace or give a refund for. (I am tired of all the arguing I am having to do).
  4. The uncertainty of what the future holds,

I wrote a letter 15 pages long to my GP (Doctor) after I received a letter to make an appointment for my annual medication review, but they could not send me a letter when I wrote to them (9 pages long) in May 2021. I sent both letters via email and both letters were acknowledged and put on the system with a response that a clinician will contact me…I am still waiting for a reply to my letter.

There is a clue in the 4 points I mentioned that can narrow down to the underlying root of how I am feeling, albeit I am also suffering from the aftermath of the domestic violence I endured on top of the daily stresses.

Anxiety

SYMPTOMS OF ANXIETY 

Anxiety may present with any of the following symptoms:

  • Nervousness (I do get nervous when I have to do things I am unfamiliar with relating to work or have to start a dispute to the point I feel sick).
  • Being overly and constantly worried (I try to keep myself busy so that I do not have to think too much about my problems).
  • Restlessness (I cannot sit and do nothing, I have to do something, I cannot do idle chitter chatter, I think sitting at a table talking nonsense whilst socializing is a waste of time, I would much rather learn something or turn the wheel to generate business than attend social gatherings -although I cannot at the moment because of my social disconnection issues).
  • Feeling a lump in your throat (If I recall experiencing fear or being in fight or flight mode I have experienced an uncomfortable feeling of finding it hard to swallow).
  • Difficulty concentrating (I have noticed that I cannot concentrate on reading books, it’s as if my mind wanders).
  • Fatigue (I am tired usually when I wake from the interrupted sleeping pattern and a combination of taking my med, so I counteract this by drinking energy drinks that are high in caffeine).
  • Irritability (I am only irritable if things do not go my way).
  • Impatience (I have a short fuse, I do not have patience and I can be rude at times although I usually do apologize I get irritable of people play me to be a fool. people should be careful to insult my intelligence).
  • Muscle tension (Not that I have noticed other than back pain or electricity shooting in the back of my neck but that could be related to Epidural Analgesia).
  • Insomnia (I take medication to send me to sleep otherwise my mind would be racing all night long and I would not be able to sleep).
  • Excessive sweating (Not that I have noticed personally)
  • Shortness of breath (If I have a panic attack, if I am extremely anxious, or if something has upset me to the point I am becoming a nervous wreck I have been known to have shortness of breath especially if I have been in a fight or flight mode due to domestic violence).
  • Stomachache (My mother suffered from stomach problems I always thought she was intolerant to certain foods but as I reflect my stomach is normally fine).
  • Diarrhea (Energy drinks do that but the way I relate to this it helps to flush all the toxins out and helps with weight gain).
  • Headache (If I get stressed my head will thump).
  • Appetite changes (I have not noticed an increase or decrease in appetite but sometimes crave chocolate, but don’t we all).

OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder)

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a mental health disorder that causes distress to the sufferer, it may be a recurrent pattern of unwanted thoughts (obsessions) such as germ contamination that lead to repetitive behaviors (compulsions) such as disinfection and quarantine. Obsessive thoughts are uncontrollable fears, ideas, sensations, or impulses that trigger extreme distress.

Because I am stressed my OCD is more visible. I may have to change my clothes multiple times in the day if I think I have brushed past something by accident. I am unstable in keeping my balance (cerebellar atrophy).

I go through about 500 pairs of disposable gloves a day and find it hard to touch things with my bare hand without disinfecting them straight after with Dettol. It has to be Dettol as the other brands I cannot get my head around that they will do the same job even though they claim they do, maybe it is my OCD that makes me think this way.

I have a quarantined area where no one can step foot apart from me, not even my daughter can touch anything that I deem to be sanitized. I am really sad that I cannot hug my daughter, I wish I could but something stops me. I know it is not her it is me and one day I will be in a better place because in the 30 years I have suffered with OCD I have managed to control it to the point it was not so prominent until I had an onset of traumatic events that caused it to come back again with a vengeance.

I am 100% convinced if I did not have stress, did not endure traumatic events, and if I did not have depression because of the stress and I was in a HAPPY PLACE my OCD would be under control. I would not say it would be 100 % cured because depending on my stress levels it would never be eradicated. Some people can deal with stress better than others. Some people, smoke cigarettes, drink alcohol, and take recreational or prescribed drugs. I only take prescribed drugs for my OCD and they do not work other than sending me to sleep.

I am always on the lookout for different ways I can control my OCD but I have only found hypnosis and meditation to help with the healing process. I am studying neuroplasticity and how to rewire our brains.

For hypnosis to work, it has to be done consistently, you will not be cured in a day, week, or month. This has to be a daily occurrence until you start noticing a change. I have completed my diploma for hypnosis and yes I did hypnotize myself successfully but I need to do it every day and with work commitments and everything else that is going on in my life I am too tired and end up falling asleep. You should do hypnosis just before you go to sleep or when you wake up. Other times you can do it during the day without distractions and religiously around the same time of the day.


Intrusive Thoughts

I live in rented accommodation and have lived in the same property for 24 years. Although I have had money in the past to buy a property I was never focused and did not understand the consequences of my actions in planning for the future. I lived in the moment and never planned my life.

My intrusive thoughts are:

  1. Will my abuser return to the UK to visit me? (That is part of the reason why I have not left my home because I am scared he may be lurking around.
  2. Will I crash and burn and lose everything? ( I got robbed a few years ago and all my valuables were stolen. I have replaced the majority of things and do not want to lose them again.
  3. Will my daughter’s health deteriorate (she suffers from multiple sclerosis)?
  4. Will my health ever improve?
  5. Will I ever be happy and in a happy place?
  6. Thoughts that cause triggers like the death of Queen II, and although the news is sad and I know a family is grieving, it has however revived memories of my parents and my brother passing which has made me have thoughts such as if our loved ones are watching over us are they disappointed in me or are they happy that I am doing everything I can to turn my life around?

Depression

Symptoms of Depression are:

  • Continuous feelings of low mood and/or sadness (I try to keep myself busy so that I do not have time to dwell too much on all the things that have gone wrong in my life).
  • Feeling hopeless and helpless (Yes I do feel hopeless at times but I always try to find the energy to fight until I reach my goals -yes I have set goals, you have to, you need to have a plan).
  • Having low self-esteem (When I wake it is like one of those movies where the person dies and comes back again and nothing has changed, well it is like that for me, I eat, sleep and repeat and nothing changes).
  • Feeling tearful constantly (I cannot say I am tearful it takes a lot to push my buttons although British Gas (Energy Supplier) did drive me to tears, so I reported them).
  • Feelings of guilt (I feel guilty for squandering my money. Had I been focused and taught how to manage my money I would be in a different place now, but you learn the hard way I have many regrets and if I could turn back time with what I know I would have done things differently knowing what I know now. I feel guilty for being stupid with my finances and the people that I trusted). I also feel guilty for distancing myself and perhaps not contacting people sooner who have now passed away (old people).
  • Feeling irritable (I only get irritable if things do not go my way or if I have to deal with stupid people)
  • Having no motivation or interest in hobbies and interests (I have plenty of things to keep me occupied, the websites that I own and manage for my clients keep me busy, never mind my content writing. I am motivated because I have gotten this far so I am not going to give up even though when I wake it takes me a minute or two to tell myself that today may be the day that things change for the better, so I carry on).
  • Being indecisive (I sometimes procrastinate over things such as whether should I start a certain project or not, or if can it wait and I end up putting it off again and again).
  • No real enjoyment in life (I live on the internet my physical self is just a vessel that keeps me going. I do not think of my life in the physical sense I have socially disconnected from the outside world other than for the couriers and workmen that come to the property and I am happy this way. Would I do things differently if I did not have OCD or feared ever crossing paths with the people that caused me harm, I don’t think so. I am happy in my own company)
  • Feeling anxious and/or worried (My mother was a worrier and I must take after her, she also had undiagnosed OCD. Yes my intrusive thoughts do sometimes get in the way, hence I keep myself busy so that I do not have time to think).
  • Thoughts of harming yourself or suicidal feelings (This is furthest from my mind. I was at my lowest and for a millisecond it did cross my mind when I endured all the physical and mental abuse from my abuser but I told myself if I quit he would win so I turned my thoughts around to show him that everything he said was wrong and that I would be successful and he would live to regret treating me the way he did).
  • Loss of appetite – although sometimes can see an increase in appetite (I see food as energy when I am hungry I will eat, I do not watch my calories and try to eat healthy most of the time, I have no problem with my appetite I should lose a bit of weight considering I do not exercise because (a) I do not venture out (b) My knee pain would be too excruciating to walk very far).
  • A general lack of energy (Because of my medication, I feel so tired when I wake so I counteract that by drinking energy drinks that are high in caffeine which causes a domino effect and causes me to have an overactive bladder)
  • Low sex drive.
  • Trouble sleeping (I do have trouble sleeping but that is alleviated with the prescribed medication, however with the interruptions to my sleep because of my overactive bladder I find when I wake I am very tired so have to drink energy drinks to keep me awake).
  • Avoiding social interaction (I have social disconnection issues and I prefer my own company)
  • Difficulty maintaining family relationships (I do not have any close relatives living in the UK other than my daughter and we have a close bond, my brother and all his children live in the USA, I guess it must be very hard for their mother who lives in the UK).

What Can Trigger a Depressive Episode? | White Light Behavioral Health (whitelightbh.com)

Further Reading:

https://disabledentrepreneur.uk/social-disconnection-entrepreneurs/

My Dreams, Aspirations & Goals

My dreams, aspirations, and goals are one day to be in a happy place live a happy life, be financially free and most of all not suffer from OCD, Stress, Anxiety, or Depression. I want to one day when I retire travel the world and photograph everything I see. I want to one day be able to document my journey and leave a legacy.

I want to motivate and inspire people so that they can be led on the right path.

I will continue to do what I am doing because I sense where I am supposed to be, is the right place to be. By continuing writing and researching I not only help myself I also help others. This online journal is my therapy because it gives me a platform to voice my knowledge, thoughts, and opinions.

My dream is to reach my goals.


#stress #anxiety #intrusivethoughts #ocd #obsessivecompulsivedisorder #depression


Blue Butterfly

How To Deal With Intrusive Thoughts

How To Deal With Intrusive Thoughts

WHAT’S IN THIS ARTICLE:

  • What are Intrusive Thoughts
  • Types Of Intrusive Thoughts
  • What You Can Do
  • Related Mental Health Disorders
  • When to Get Help

Overview:

The majority of us from time to time experience worry, anxiety, stress, depression, grief, and fear. If you are reading this and do not agree that you have never experienced any of the above, you are not being true to yourself.

Sometimes we experience unwanted thoughts like did we shut the door behind us or did we turn off the stove. This annoying thought may get stuck in our heads until we put our minds at ease. Usually, you can ignore it and move on. But sometimes, it just keeps returning.

What are Intrusive Thoughts?

Intrusive thoughts or negative thoughts are thoughts that either lingers on your mind or pop in out of nowhere. They are part of our coping mechanisms. However unwanted lingering thoughts stem from stress, fear, and anxiety. People who have suffered trauma can affect their beliefs about the future via loss of hope, limited expectations about life, fear that life will end abruptly or early, or anticipation that normal life events won’t occur (e.g., access to education, ability to have a significant and committed relationship, good opportunities for work). All these events can manifest intrusive thoughts.

Understanding the Impact of Trauma – Trauma-Informed Care in Behavioral Health Services – NCBI Bookshelf (nih.gov)

Nearly everyone experiences Intrusive Thoughts from time to time”.

So why do these thoughts happen and what causes them?

An intrusive thought is not always related to an underlying condition. It may be caused by:

Intrusive thoughts either linger on one’s mind or simply come in out of nowhere.

These thoughts are unpleasant and unwanted and manifest in our minds, sometimes without warning or other times if we dwell on something for long periods that is worrying us.

These thoughts can sometimes be violent, sexual, or simply harmless worries.

Intrusive thoughts usually heighten when you feel, stressed or distressed, typically having an intrusive once in a while is just part of life.

It only becomes concerning if your thoughts because dangerous and uncontrollable.

In most cases, intrusive thoughts do not have any particular meaning. As long as you recognize that these are only thoughts and are controllable and harmless and that you have no desire to act on them, intrusive thoughts are usually not harmful.

However, if they’re happening often, causing significant concern, or interfering with your daily activities, it’s a good idea to talk with a doctor.

I must admit that I do suffer from intrusive thoughts occasionally, especially when I am stressed or depressed but would never act on them other than if they were related to OCD Germ Contamination. Through my learning journey, I am trying to heal. In fact, I have completed my Diploma in Hypnotherapy, and am studying Neuroplasticity.

Intrusive thoughts can range from random images to disturbing and violent ideas like punching someone in the face or hurting yourself.

(Yes I have had thoughts of punching someone in the face, but I would not go through with such a ludicrous idea because (a) my OCD germ contamination thought would kick in of actually physically touching someone, and secondly (b) it is simply a stupid thought).

Other intrusive thoughts are: did I cross-contaminate (did I touch something by accident) and does my thought warrant me to act on my compulsion such as changing my clothes because my daughter’s cat brushed past me? Usually, I try and fight the urge (CBT). Depending on how stressed I am will depend on how successfully I can resist the thought. Most of the time my germ contamination thoughts overpower me, like I said it all depends on my anxiety and stress levels.

I am aware that with OCD sometimes it is hard to fight your thoughts and you succumb to the urge. Hypnotherapy and meditation help with the process of healing.

Survivor of Domestic Violence

Whilst I was enduring emotional and physical abuse, the thought of harming myself crossed my mind, but again I knew I had to prove to the abuser that I would not be broken, no matter how many times he tried and kept saying to myself what does not kill you make you stronger. I decided no matter how low he made me feel I would not give him the satisfaction and would not give up. I decided to focus on building this site and working really hard. He eventually left with his tail between his legs because he knew he was defeated and no matter what he did or said to me was no longer working. I felt rejoiceful that he had lost his battle to destroy me and I concentrated on moving forward by suppressing all my thoughts and all the bad memories by putting the past behind me.

(I am a survivor of domestic violence, the abuser has left the country).

For anyone else experiencing intrusive thoughts, they are usually harmless as long as they can be under control. But if you obsess about them to the extent that it interrupts your day-to-day life, this can be a sign of an underlying mental health problem.

Intrusive thoughts can be a symptom of grief, stress, anxiety, depression, or obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

Types of Intrusive Thoughts

OCD thoughts.

OCD thoughts depending what type of OCD you have. There are Nineteen Characteristics of OCD. With OCD the sufferer that has intrusive thoughts usually actions the compulsions to ease the discomfort of the thought lingering in their head, this could be from checking the door handles and switches to counting or avoiding certain numbers, objects, or people. This is a defense mechanism to protect the sufferer from their fear that if they do not carry out the compulsion something bad might happen.

Sexual thoughts.

Sexual thoughts are usually natural regardless of gender. An Intrusive sexual thought however when it becomes uncomfortable with or shocked by the thoughts and images to the point you are fixated on something, you should talk it over with a professional.

Experts say it’s best to remind yourself that these are just passing, automatic thoughts. They don’t define you in any way.

Violent thoughts.

Violent thoughts of punching someone in the face are harmless as long as you do not act on them.

Sometimes violent thoughts may have dark meanings like harming yourself or someone else. Usually, these thoughts are harmless, even repetitive as long as you have no intention to act on them. These thoughts are very unpleasant and if you feel you cannot cope you should speak with a professional or phone the Samaritans. You can also contact us and keep yourself anonymous if you prefer. These thoughts usually pass in time. But if you find yourself planning to follow your thoughts through, you need to speak with a professional to help to manage your emotions. Talk to a doctor or a therapist.

Negative thoughts.

Negative thoughts can be multiple ideas. An example you have imposter syndrome, you feel like a failure or if you think about something negative will happen because you essentially are manifesting it in your life. The more you think negatively the chances of whatever you are thinking will come true. It is best to rewire my mind. These thoughts should fade as your situation changes. But if they become overwhelming, you could have depression or anxiety. Talk to a mental health professional about how to control your symptoms.

However, science teaches us that In 1949, psychologist Donald Hebb laid out his compelling “assembly theory” of how the brain achieves this feat. It is best summarized by the mantra “neurons that fire together wire together.” Meaning what we reap is what we sow in other words if we continually think negatively eventually what we are thinking will happen. The idea is that neurons responding to the same stimulus connect preferentially to form “neuronal ensembles.”

What You Can Do


The best way to heal is to learn about the brain and our thoughts, learning about our conscious mind and our subconscious mind helps us understand the supercomputers we have (brain), yet, we only use a total of 5% of our entire human mind Keeping ourselves busy and distracting ourselves is a strategy to heal.

At the end of the day, most intrusive thoughts are just thoughts.

The only time they become a red flag or a signal that you actually want to do the disturbing things you’re thinking about is when you feel you are no longer in control.

If they bother you, you can take steps to cut down on their frequency and intensity.

You Can:

  • Evaluate your life and what is troubling you.
  • Recognize your thoughts and label them for what they are.
  • Distract yourself from your thoughts, watch a movie, read a book or do some scripting and write your thoughts down on paper in a journal or online.
  • Release the tension and share your thoughts with others. (There are groups and forums you can join or if your thoughts are overwhelming contact a professional like your doctor or phone the Samaritans.
  • Accept that they will pass eventually.
  • Listen to empowering motivational speakers like Jake Ducey or Dr. Caroline Leaf. Check them out on YouTube.
  • Give yourself time for the intrusive thoughts to fade away.
  • Be prepared for your unwanted thoughts to come back.
  • Learn about your mind and neuroplasticity and how your thoughts can be controlled.

Do Not:

  • Do not act or engage in dangerous thoughts, for example hurting yourself or someone else.
  • Do not be too hard on yourself. Try to question yourself and why you’re having them in the first place.
  • Do not just do nothing in the hope your thoughts will go away. Often distracting yourself from a situation will get your mind occupied with other things and your thoughts become suppressed.

Related Mental Health Disorders.

Sometimes, thoughts go beyond being intrusive.

Related mental health disorders associated with repetitive unwanted intrusive thoughts, could be a sign of OCD. This type of anxiety disorder causes the sufferer to have recurring, unwanted thoughts that they may not be able to control. This may be the compulsion to repeat certain behaviors or actions over and over again.

In contrast, delusional paranoid thoughts, such as thinking someone is always watching you or wants to hurt you, can be a sign of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.

If you have these thoughts, talk to a psychiatrist for diagnosis and treatment options.

When to Get Help

If your intrusive thoughts become unmanageable and start to take over your life, you need to seek professional help or as I am doing am learning online, keeping myself busy all the time, and doing extensive research. I will not claim to be the next Paul Mckenna of this world and one day I would like to meet him, but I do believe hypnotherapy and meditation play an important part in the healing process. The issue with hypnotherapy and meditation is you have to keep at it, you cannot just do it once and expect miracles it does not work like that.

Although I have completed my Hypnotherapy Diploma and have hypnotized myself I have not done it enough times to actually see much of a difference hence I re-iterate that you need to be consistent with it.

The way I deal with intrusive thoughts is by scripting and using my online journal. I feel much better after I have released my energy and often anger either on paper or mostly online.

If you are finding life too difficult to bear and you are getting contact with intrusive dangerous thoughts, contact your Doctor or Emergency Services.

A doctor may refer you to a behavioral therapist, psychologist, social worker, or psychiatrist for further diagnosis and treatment.

Personally, for me, this is my own process of healing, learning, and passing my knowledge to others.

“An Investment In Knowledge Pays The Best Interest” – by Benjamin Fraklin

Remember we have a useful links page and depending on where you are in the world you have your Doctor you can contact or emergency services (112) this is the international number. In the UK we have (999) and for nonurgent (111).

Further Reading

My Daily Mental and Physical Self-Care Routine & How I Manage My Menta – Dr. Leaf (drleaf.com)

Debunking the Serotonin-Depression Theory (with Psychiatrist & Profess – Dr. Leaf (drleaf.com)

The Difference Between the Nonconscious, Subconscious & Conscious Mind – Dr. Leaf (drleaf.com)

The Great Psychiatry Fraud – Dr. Leaf (drleaf.com)

#intrusivethoughts #ocd #negativethoughts #neuroplasticity #neuroscience #hypnosis #meditation #learning

The Serotonin Theory

The Serotonin Theory.

I have been a sufferer of mental health for the best part of 30 years diagnosed to include depression and OCD. During this time I have tried CBT Therapy, seen a therapist, and have been given medication that has altered over the years from Prozac, Sertraline, and Mirtazapine. These drugs have literally done nothing for me other than make me feel zombified. I am now researching neuroplasticity and how hypnosis and meditation can help me heal through my own self-help therapy. So learning that some mental health disorders have nothing to do with a chemical imbalance does not surprise me. If anything dopamine the happy feeling we have when we are engaged in something we like may help us overcome disorders. Although I joke around, if I was happy living on cloud nine, I reckon I would not have as many issues as I have now (the reason I say this is I have hit highs and lows and when I am happy without a care in the world my symptoms start to subside).

Dopamine is a medication form of a substance that occurs naturally in the body. It works by improving the pumping strength of the heart and improving blood flow to the kidneys. Dopamine injection (Intropin) is used to treat certain conditions that occur when you are in shock, which may be caused by a heart attack, trauma, surgeryheart failurekidney failure, and other serious medical conditions. Dopamine is a type of neurotransmitter. Your body makes it, and your nervous system uses it to send messages between nerve cells. That’s why it’s sometimes called a chemical messenger. Dopamine plays a role in how we feel pleasure. It’s a big part of our uniquely human ability to think and plan. It helps us strive, focus, and find things interesting.

Doctors are starting to rethink that ‘chemical imbalance’ does not cause depression. Psychiatry has known for some time that the “serotonin theory” of depression, the notion that too little of the brain chemical can be a cause of depression, is a decades-old hypothesis and deeply entrenched trope in society that helped promote a class of antidepressants taken by millions is wrong, says Montreal psychiatrist Dr. Joel Paris.

Montreal psychiatrist Dr. Joel Paris: “I am afraid this has something to do with the toxic relationship between industry and academia.”© Christinne Muschi for Postmedia/File “You want to know why it took so long for the truth to come out,” Paris, a professor of psychiatry at McGill University, wrote in an email. “I am afraid this has something to do with the toxic relationship between industry and academia.” Drug companies encourage doctors to prescribe often, and heavily, he said, and have “paid many academic psychiatrists to promote their products.”

Two months after a major review found no support for the hypothesis that depression is caused by lowered serotonin activity or concentrations, and no convincing evidence of a “chemical imbalance,” the paper is still stirring controversy. Its authors say they have been ridiculed and attacked and accused of dog whistling far-right commentators who have groundlessly linked antidepressants to mass shootings. Responses from psychiatrists have been oddly contradictory, ranging from “nothing new here, of course, we knew it was never serotonin, it was never that simple” to criticisms that it’s premature to toss out the serotonin theory outright and that the authors missed some studies and interpreted others incorrectly.

Dr. Joanna Moncrieff, a consultant psychiatrist, and professor of critical and social psychiatry at University College London told the National Post. Specifically, drugs known as SSRIs, or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been said to work by correcting abnormally low serotonin, a neurotransmitter that helps move messages between brain cells and that’s thought to play a role in how our brains process emotions. Moncrieff’s study didn’t look at the efficacy of SSRIs, just how likely they are to do what people have been told they do, and she’s been accused of seriously over-stepping the data. “It seems the main criticism is that antidepressants work,” Moncrieff said. “It doesn’t matter how they work. It doesn’t matter that the original idea, the original theory for how they work is unproven. They work, and that’s all that matters.”

Contrary to any arguments or beliefs and being a sufferer for more than 30 years I know that anti-depressants make you feel zonked out, they do not allow you to function properly and make you tired and lethargic. So although I take Mirtazapine and although it is meant to be for depression, and OCD, all it does is send me to sleep, and when I wake I have to drink energy drinks to help me function during the day”.

To Moncrieff, it matters. “Because whether they work or not depends on how we understand what they are doing.” And if they are not correcting a serotonin imbalance, or reversing some underlying mechanism of depression, what are they doing? “We have to consider other possible ways that they may be ‘working,’ inverted commas, which include the fact they are drugs that change normal brain chemistry.”

The serotonin “bombshell” caused an international media frenzy, though was largely ignored in Canada, with many headlines along the lines of, “How were so many duped?” Some psychiatric opinion leaders dismissed the study as “old wine in new bottles,” arguing that no serious psychiatrist today believes depressions are due to a tidy, simple imbalance in brain chemicals or “serotonergic deficit.” Apparently, no one told the public. One survey of Australian adults found that 88 percent believe in the “chemical imbalance” hypothesis of depression. A British Columbia government website says the SSRI escitalopram “works by helping to restore the balance of a certain natural substance (serotonin) in the brain.” Forbes Health quoted a Vanderbilt University psychiatrist explaining that SSRIs like Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft, and their generic equivalents work by boosting serotonin activity in the brain.The idea is that if you have more serotonin in your synapses (regions in the brain where nerve impulses are sent and received) the better your mood will be.”

“Here is my take on this, if someone was to give me £1m and said it was mine to do what I want and never have to pay it back, my mood would change. Serotonin also found in chocolate has done nothing for my health other than make me gain weight” If you could erase all my bad memories and heal by starting a new life so would my mental health become better. I have known for years the medication I take does nothing for me other than send me to sleep or make me really drowsy and I have been on a fair few in my time. I know if I was happy, I would see an improvement in my mental well-being without a shadow of a doubt, because I have seen for myself how my moods change.

“It may well be the case that psychiatrists have a more ‘sophisticated’ understanding of the role of serotonin than the lay public,” Moncrieff and one of her co-authors, Dr. Mark Horowitz later wrote for Mad in America, “but psychiatrists have failed to correct this misunderstanding.”

I, therefore, challenge anyone and want to prove my theory. I know when I was happy my OCD was less noticeable (if anything it was 95 % eradicated, I still had the odd intrusive thought here and there, and tried to fight the uncomfortable feeling with CBT). Through traumatic events over the last two decades, I am back to feeling unhappy and have had to start healing. Only a drastic intervention can cure me now”.

I did not have depression, because I was happy”.

The serotonin theory seemed promising when first introduced 60 years ago, “but was soon discarded,” said Dr. Allen Frances, a professor emeritus of psychiatry at Duke University who led the task force that created the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in 1994.

The association was weak and often didn’t replicate. “Depressions are so remarkably heterogenous, there can’t possibly be any unitary cause,” Frances said. “Further study revealed just how ridiculously complicated in brain structure and function.”

SSRIs like Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft account for 44 percent of the leading prescribed drug class in Canada — psychotherapeutics.© Joe Raedle/Getty Images

But the “chemical imbalance” theory was a marketing godsend for drug companies, following the benzodiazepine crisis in the 60s and 70s when the highly addictive tranquilizers were “doled out by the bucketload” to people, particularly women, who were unhappy “just to numb their unhappiness,” Moncrieff said.

In the 1980s, when the first SSRI, Prozac, was launched, “the pharmaceutical industry knew it couldn’t market them in the same way (as benzos) because numbing someone’s unhappiness had got a bad rep with the benzodiazepines, Moncrieff said. “So, it had to convince people that they had an underlying disease and needed to take the drugs for an underlying disease.”

“If you think something is wrong with your brain and a drug is going to put it right, of course, you’re going to take it.”

For their “umbrella” review published in Nature’s Molecular Psychiatry, Moncrieff and her co-authors reviewed high-level studies in six major areas of research spanning 56 years that together involved tens of thousands of people. While there’s no such thing as a “normal level” of serotonin, Moncrieff said, the studies involved indirect measures of serotonin activity, looking at, for example, serotonin and its breakdown products in people’s blood or cerebral spinal fluid, and comparing those levels between people diagnosed with depression, and people not diagnosed with depression, the healthy “controls.”

The researchers found no overall difference in levels of serotonin between the two groups. Serotonin is made from tryptophan, an essential amino acid that comes from the diet. When healthy people were put on diets lacking tryptophan, it didn’t make them depressed. When the researchers looked at studies of genes involved in the brain’s serotonin system, again there was no consistent difference between depressed and healthy volunteers.

“I think people need to think carefully about why they are taking (SSRIs) and what they think the drug is doing for them,” Moncrieff said. “If they are taking the drug because they think it’s correcting an imbalance in their brain, I would suggest that they could re-evaluate whether they need to take it,” she said. “They should, of course, not stop it suddenly,” she said. “They should do that slowly and gradually,” under a prescriber’s care.

What’s often lost in the loaded and polarized controversy over chemical imbalance and depression, Frances said, is that mild depressions are usually triggered by stresses in our lives and don’t require medications. “Instead, they improve with time, support, reduced stress and/or psychotherapy,” he said. Severe depressions do require meds and rarely respond to anything else, he said. “No one size fits all.”

However, “Continued attacks on the ‘chemical imbalance theory’ by anti-psychiatrists are beating a long dead horse and have the harmful unintended consequence of discouraging people with severe depression from taking the meds they desperately need and won’t get well without,” Frances said.

But if psychiatry knew the chemical imbalance theory isn’t real, they had a professional duty to tell people, said Marnie Wedlake, a psychotherapist and assistant professor in the School of Health Studies at Western University.

“If they knew this was a false narrative, as the self-proclaimed and publicly recognized primary experts, they should have been out there saying, ‘No, no, no. Correction.’ But they did not. They just let it go.’”

Still, while it would be easy to pile all blame on psychiatry and the drug industry, “that’s too tidy,” Wedlake said.

We’ve allowed a “pathologizing” of our human condition, she said. “If I’m feeling happy and peaceful, that’s great, but anything else has become a symptom.” When high school kids talk about their emotions today, “they use language that medicalizes their thoughts and feelings,” she said. “It’s just my OCD,” obsessive-compulsive disorder. “I was a shy kid. Kids in my class now in university, they’ve got social anxiety disorder.”

It’s hard to sit with despair she said, even though our human condition includes a heavy dose of it.

“As a species, we don’t know what to do with despair anymore. Ideally, we would say, ‘Okay, I’m feeling somewhat despairing, it’s just part of my life, the full colour spectrum of who I am. Sometimes I’m angry, sometimes I’m sad…. But it has been pathologized, and we don’t know what to do with it.’”

And SSRIs are being prescribed not just for depression, but for social anxiety disorder, panic disorder, OCD, phobias, and the list ever expands.

Meanwhile, the mental health system is failing, “miserably,” Wedlake said. “We’ve got Apps and 10 sessions of group CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy) you might have to wait for a year-and-a-half for. If you’ve got someone living with extraordinary internal distress, 10 sessions of group CBT are like a band-aid on someone who has been in a car wreck.

“We don’t have the psychotherapeutic resources we need to meet the needs of those who need to deal with their distress.”

If people can’t afford private psychotherapy, if they can’t function or work, “the only option that’s available to them is the Paxil, Prozac, Zoloft, or Celexa that their GP is handing out,” she said. “People are stuck.”

Moncrieff, the co-founder of the Critical Psychiatry Network and author of The Myth of the Chemical Cure and other books, said she is “definitely not anti-drug. I see myself as being a very cautious person in relation to drugs.” She uses them in her own practice for people with severe illnesses like schizophrenia. Sedatives like benzodiazepines can be helpful in a crisis, short term, she said. “But I think that drugs that affect the brain, we should be cautious about.”

There’s no evidence they’re reversing an underlying brain abnormality, she said, but “they are doing something to the brain. And by doing that they change our normal mental states.”

SSRIs have been widely reported to cause an emotional blunting effect, a blunting of both positive and negative emotions. “Maybe there are some people who feel that is a useful effect for them. Some people will just decide they want to carry on taking antidepressants. That’s fine. I just think people need to have this information.”

Montreal psychiatrist Dr. Joel Paris: “I am afraid this has something to do with the toxic relationship between industry and academia.”© Christinne Muschi for Postmedia/File Is she anti-psychiatry? “I question the idea that mental disorders are usefully thought of as brain disease,” Moncrieff said.  I don’t think they’re the same sort of thing as having a brain tumor or multiple sclerosis.

That doesn’t mean there’s not something going on in the brain, she said. “Of course, there is.” Serotonin is just one chemical that’s been implicated. “But that doesn’t help explain the situation. And we probably never will be able to quite pin down what it is, anyway.”

Paris, of McGill, agrees that SSRIs are overused. “The old adage is that if you have a hammer, everything looks like a nail. Clinicians want to do something for their patient, and these days that will usually be a prescription, given that psychotherapy is so poorly insured in Canada.”

The result is over-prescribing, and “polypharmacy,” giving people multiple medications, “but you can’t blame that on an incorrect theory.” Even though we don’t know how antidepressants work — some have suggested neurogenesis, the formation of new neurons, might be at play — “they do work for a lot of people,” Paris said. “Like so many treatments in psychiatry, and in medicine as a whole, to be fair, the effects are entirely empirical,” said Paris, who offers antidepressants if there are good reasons to suspect they will help.

Note From The Editor.

I am starting one course at a time and have already completed my diploma in OCD & Hoarding Hypnosis and I am starting to research and study neuroplasticity.

Renata Hypnotherapy Diploma

From what I have learned so far, always think in the present tense, when you are thinking about your dream job, dream, home, or dream vacation. Always be grateful for what you have and always say thank you to your God or the Universe. Believe you already have this and meditate just as you are falling asleep or when you have just woken. Visualize you already have what you desire. Never say (if (if I had it) when (when I get it), or any negative thoughts out loud). Our mind has five states beta, alpha, theta, delta, and gamma. They are distinguished by brain activity and predominant brain wave signals. This speed and frequency are measured in ‘Hertz’ and the figures are obtained using an Electrocardiogram (EEG) machine. Your 5 Brainwaves: Delta, Theta, Alpha, Beta and Gamma | Lucid We have the ability to rewire our minds, through hypnotherapy, meditation, and positive thinking.

Further Reading:

#serotonin #dopamine #neurotransmitter #neurons #neuroplasticity #neuroscience

Change Your Attitude With Gratitude 2022

Change Your Attitude with Gratitude New Years Resolution 2022.

Whenever we celebrate a New Year we mark it with New Years Resolutions. We celebrate out with the old in and with the new, we say to ourselves we will go on a diet, lose weight, eat healthier, hit the gym, or quit smoking. We aim to do all the wonderful things we dream of, but it is so often the case our resolutions fall through after a month or two because half the time we lack willpower and motivation, we do not have it embedded in our subconscious minds that what we want we can manifest. Essentially we need to brainwash ourselves to believe we can do anything and have anything we desire.

Practicing Daily Gratitude

10 Ways to Practice Daily Gratitude 

One of the most powerful ways to rewire your brain is to re-wire your thoughts. Having a positive attitude will bring more positivity and abundance into your life. Being constantly worried and having negative thoughts will only bring on more stress and worry. Therefore in order to change your attitude to life be grateful for what you already have and be positive that more great things will come to you providing you change your way of thinking.

  1. One of the things I love doing is writing and although I have a physical journal I also write my thoughts on my online journal. By keeping a Gratitude Journal one can write our thoughts, dreams and desires with a daily routine in which we can remind ourselves of the gifts, grace, benefits, and good things we enjoy. Remembering moments of gratitude associated with events past and present, your personal attributes, or people you admire gives you the potential to interweave a sustainable life of gratefulness.
  2. Write down at least 10 things you are truly grateful for and on the next page write down in the present tense as if you have already manifested it what you are grateful what has come into your life, rather than what is coming.
  3. Spending 5 minutes in the morning and 5 minutes before you fall asleep to visualise your aspirations will help to hypnotise yourself and change your subconcious mind. Brainwash yourself before the world brainwashes you. Find a quite relaxing place where you can meditate and relax and focus on what you truly desire.
  4. Research and learn from motivation speakers who mention about the law of Attraction and The Secret. (Bob Proctor, Jake Ducey etc). Watch the film “The Secret”.
  5. When ever you hear someone talk praise them for their achievements. Share Your Gratitude with Others. Research has found that expressing gratitude can help strengthen relationships and bring us closer together. People are more inclined to warm to you if you express gratitude and pat them on their back. The next time you see a female compliment them. The next time your partner, friend or family member does something you appreciate, be sure to let tell them how proud you are of them.
  6. Remove all negitivity in your life, this means anything that reminds you of something bad that has happened in your life to halting all contact with any negative person that does not praise you, does not encourage you or only has snide remarks to say about you. If they are judgemental as in my case someone in my inner circle that thinks she is better than me because she lives in a new build mortgaged house whislt I live in Grade A Listed rented appartment that is falling apart. What she does not realise my digital assets are worth more than her house will ever be. But I have shown gratitude to her children.
  7. Always have either flash cards that you carry in your pocket, purse or handbag. Have your reminders on the homescreen of your phone and also on your desktop. Have a vision board of what you want to achieve, so it is staring you in the face. Stick your reminders on refridgerators. . Use visual reminders because the two primary obstacles to gratefulness are forgetfulness and a lack of mindful awareness, visual reminders serve as cues to trigger thoughts of gratitude.
  8. Be consistant and do it daily. I usually stick a video on youtube or listen to some hypnotherapy audios. Research shows that changing our thought patterns to perform a behavior increases the likelihood that the action will be executed. Set an alarm everyday to promt you to execute your meditation.
  9. Be kind and mindful of others. If you disagree with someone do not fuel the fire with your negativity. The best practice is to be kind, patient and understanding. Be grateful for what others have done for you.
  10. Gratefulness includes smiling, using etiquette, saying thank you, when someone does or says something that is kind and thoughtful, writing letters of gratitude, including emails. By being consistently grateful, you will trigger the emotion of gratitude instantaneously and have it embedded in your subconsious mind.

What I am grateful for.

I have listed below the things I am most grateful for, you could personalize it to suit your own circumstances.

  1. I am grafeful I have roof over my head.
  2. I am grateful I have food to eat.
  3. I am a grateful I have drinking flowing water.
  4. I am grateful I have hot running water.
  5. I am grateful my home is warm.
  6. I am grateful I can pay my bills.
  7. I am grateful I have internet and a good connection.
  8. I am grateful money comes in on a regular basis.
  9. I am grateful I own digital assets (digital real estate).
  10. I am grateful I am creative.
  11. I am grateful I have a good imagination.
  12. I am grateful I am an entrepreneur.
  13. I am grateful I can write and have a platform to write on.
  14. I am grateful people find my writing inspiring and motivational.
  15. I am grateful people find that I have a wealth of knowledge and can help them.
  16. I am grateful I am a publish author.
  17. I am grateful my books are selling.
  18. I am grateful I have wisdom.
  19. I am grateful I have clients.
  20. I am grateful I have a beautiful, intelligent daughter.
  21. I am grateful I have my own websites.
  22. I am grateful I am driving traffic to my websites.
  23. I am grateful I can offer many services.
  24. I am grateful people are buying my services.
  25. I am grateful my domain names are being sold.
  26. I am grateful I can help generate traffic and leads.
  27. I am grateful that I can keep my prices low and be competitive in the industry I am in.
  28. I am grateful I have the ability to teach people and mentor them.
  29. I am grateful I am getting regular subscribers and am expanding my network of connections and followers.
  30. I am grateful most of my websites are on the first page of Google.
  31. I am grateful that the websites which are not on the first page of Google will be soon.
  32. I am grateful I am multi-talented and can re-invent myself.
  33. I am grateful I have learned about hypnotherapy.
  34. I am grateful that I have enough knowledge and content to write a book about neuroplasticity and empowering the disabled entrepreneurial mind.
  35. I am grateful I am self-healing and starting to heal my emotional wounds.
  36. I am grateful people trust and believe in me.
  37. I am grateful 2022 will be a prosperous year for me.
  38. I am happy and grateful I am a spiritual multi-millionaire.

Further Reading.

Jake Ducey Hypnotherapy Audio and Videos can you accessed here.

https://disabledentrepreneur.uk/category/self-hypnosis/

https://www.mindful.org/an-introduction-to-mindful-gratitude/

If you found this article helpful, please take a moment to comment, share and subscribe.

Wishing all my readers a Happy New Year 2022.

#gratitude #selfhypnosis #hypnosis #bobprocter #lawofattraction #thesecret #jakeducey #napoleanhill #thinkandgrowrich

« Older posts