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Category: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

How to Stop Feeling Depressed: A Comprehensive Guide to Regaining Your Mental Well-Being

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Depression can be a combination of stress, anxiety, and grief.

How to Stop Feeling Depressed: A Comprehensive Guide to Regaining Your Mental Well-Being

Depression is a complex and challenging mental health condition that affects millions of people worldwide. It can sap your energy, alter your perspective, and make everyday life feel like an insurmountable hurdle. While there is no quick fix for depression, there are numerous strategies and techniques you can use to help alleviate its symptoms and work towards recovery. well-being.

  1. Seek Professional Help: The first step in dealing with depression is seeking professional help. A qualified mental health provider, such as a therapist, psychologist, or psychiatrist, can assess your condition and create a tailored treatment plan. They may recommend therapy, medication, or a combination of both. Don’t hesitate to reach out to a healthcare professional, as they have the knowledge and experience to guide you through this challenging time.
  2. Open Up to Someone You Trust: Sharing your feelings with someone you trust can be incredibly therapeutic. Whether it’s a friend, family member, or partner, having a support system can help you feel less isolated and more understood. They can provide a listening ear and emotional support during difficult moments. Alternatively, start an online journal and document how you feel, this will give people the opportunity to interact and relate to what you are going through. Join online groups, where you can share your story with a community. You should never suffer in silence, there will be always someone you can talk to and we have a list of useful resources you can check out here!
  3. Prioritize Self-Care: Self-care is a fundamental aspect of managing depression. Pay attention to your physical and emotional needs: (a) Establish a Routine: Create a daily schedule that includes regular sleep, healthy meals, exercise, and relaxation time. A structured routine can provide stability and a sense of purpose. (b) Get Enough Sleep: Aim for 7-9 hours of quality sleep each night. Proper rest is crucial for mood regulation and overall mental health. (c) Exercise Regularly: Physical activity has been shown to release endorphins, which can improve mood. Even a short daily walk can make a difference. (d) Eat a Balanced Diet: Nutrient-rich foods can positively impact your mood and energy levels. Avoid excessive caffeine, alcohol, and sugary foods, which can exacerbate depression. (e) Practice Mindfulness and Relaxation Techniques: Mindfulness meditation, deep breathing exercises, and progressive muscle relaxation can help reduce stress and improve your emotional well-being.
  4. Challenge Negative Thoughts: Depression often involves negative thought patterns and self-critical thinking. Try to identify these thoughts and challenge them with evidence-based reasoning. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a helpful approach for changing negative thought patterns and promoting a more positive outlook.
  5. Engage in Activities You Enjoy: Depression can rob you of your interest in activities you once enjoyed. However, pushing yourself to engage in these activities can help combat depressive symptoms. Whether it’s a hobby, a sport, or a creative pursuit, doing things you love can provide a sense of accomplishment and pleasure.
  6. Set Realistic Goals: Set achievable goals for yourself, no matter how small they may seem. Accomplishing even minor tasks can boost your self-esteem and motivation. Break larger goals into smaller, manageable steps to make them less daunting.
  7. Build a Social Support Network: Maintaining social connections is crucial for mental health. Reconnect with old friends, join support groups, or consider group therapy. Surrounding yourself with understanding and supportive individuals can be a source of strength during tough times.
  8. Limit Stressors: Identify and reduce sources of stress in your life. This may involve setting boundaries at work, reevaluating your commitments, or seeking professional help for specific stress-related issues.
  9. Consider Medication: In some cases, medication prescribed by a healthcare professional may be necessary to manage depression. Antidepressant medications can help regulate brain chemistry and alleviate symptoms. It’s essential to consult a healthcare provider to discuss the potential benefits and risks of medication.

Things you should avoid doing if you are feeling depressed.

When you’re feeling depressed, it’s essential to be mindful of your actions and choices to prevent exacerbating your symptoms.

Here is a list of things you should avoid doing if you are experiencing depression:

  1. Isolating Yourself: One of the most common tendencies when feeling depressed is to withdraw from social interactions. Isolation can intensify feelings of loneliness and despair. Try to maintain connections with friends and loved ones, even if it is only online.
  2. Ignoring Professional Help: Avoid neglecting the importance of seeking professional assistance. A mental health provider can offer guidance, therapy, and, if necessary, medication to help manage your depression.
  3. Self-Medicating with Alcohol or Drugs: Using substances like alcohol or drugs as a coping mechanism can worsen depression symptoms, lead to addiction, and create more significant mental health issues. Seek healthier ways to cope.
  4. Negative Self-Talk: Be mindful of the way you speak to yourself. Constant self-criticism and negative self-talk can deepen feelings of worthlessness. Challenge and replace these thoughts with more positive and realistic ones.
  5. Overloading Yourself with Responsibilities: Trying to manage too many tasks or responsibilities can be overwhelming and exacerbate feelings of stress and hopelessness. Prioritize self-care and set realistic limits.
  6. Skipping Meals or Overeating: Nutrition plays a significant role in mood regulation. Skipping meals or turning to unhealthy comfort foods can negatively affect your mood. Aim for a balanced diet with regular meals.
  7. Engaging in Self-Harm: Self-harm, such as cutting or burning, is never a healthy way to cope with depression. If you are struggling with self-harm tendencies, seek immediate professional help or reach out to a trusted person in your life.
  8. Ruminating on Negative Thoughts: Repeatedly dwelling on negative thoughts and past regrets can intensify feelings of hopelessness and sadness. Practice techniques like mindfulness to redirect your focus to the present moment.
  9. Avoiding Physical Activity: A sedentary lifestyle can contribute to feelings of lethargy and exacerbate depression. Even light physical activity, such as a short walk, can improve mood and energy levels.
  10. Staying in Unhealthy Relationships: Toxic or abusive relationships can contribute to depression. If possible, distance yourself from unhealthy connections and seek support from friends, family, or professionals.
  11. Comparing Yourself to Others: Constantly comparing yourself to others, especially on social media, can lead to feelings of inadequacy and low self-esteem. Remember that people often present curated versions of their lives online.
  12. Ignoring Warning Signs: If you notice concerning changes in your behavior, mood, or thought patterns, don’t dismiss them. These signs may indicate that your depression is worsening, and it’s crucial to seek help promptly.
  13. Avoiding Sunshine and Nature: Lack of exposure to natural light and outdoor environments can impact your mood negatively. Spend time outdoors, even if it’s just a few minutes in your backyard or a nearby park.
  14. Ignoring Hygiene and Self-Care: Neglecting personal hygiene and self-care can make you feel worse about yourself. Establish a daily routine that includes basic self-care activities like showering and grooming.
  15. Suppressing Your Feelings: Avoid bottling up your emotions. Find healthy outlets for expressing your feelings, whether through journaling, talking to someone you trust, or creative endeavors like art or music.

Depression in most cases is a treatable condition, although people can relapse from time to time depending on their circumstances such as anxiety, stress, and worry e.g. rent increases and not having enough money to live on.

Grief Can Prolong Your Depression.

Grief can potentially prolong or exacerbate depression. Grief is a normal response to loss, and it can trigger depressive symptoms. When someone experiences prolonged or complicated grief, it can significantly impact their mental and emotional well-being. Grief-related depression often involves persistent sadness, hopelessness, and difficulty finding joy in life. If grief is left unprocessed or unaddressed, it can contribute to the development of clinical depression. Seeking support and professional help can be crucial in managing both grief and depression, as they may require different therapeutic approaches and interventions.

Grief can also play an important factor when someone close to you dies. Grief can last for days, weeks, months, or years or you may never get over losing your loved ones.

Grief is a natural emotional response to loss, and it can be triggered by a wide range of experiences and circumstances.

Here is a list of reasons why someone may experience grief:

  1. Death of a Loved One: The most common and well-known cause of grief is the death of a family member, friend, or pet.
  2. Divorce or Relationship Breakup: The end of a significant romantic relationship can lead to profound feelings of loss and grief.
  3. Loss of a Job: Being laid off or losing a job can result in grief, as it often involves the loss of financial security and a sense of purpose.
  4. Loss of a Friendship: The ending of a close friendship or the drifting apart of friends can lead to feelings of grief and loneliness.
  5. Miscarriage or Stillbirth: The loss of a pregnancy or the death of a baby before or shortly after birth can be an immensely painful and grief-inducing experience.
  6. Health Diagnosis: A severe or terminal illness diagnosis for oneself or a loved one can trigger anticipatory grief as individuals grapple with the idea of loss.
  7. End of a Dream or Goal: Failing to achieve a long-held dream, such as a career aspiration, academic goal, or personal achievement, can lead to grief over the loss of that vision for the future.
  8. Moving or Relocation: Leaving a familiar home, neighborhood, or city can result in feelings of loss and nostalgia for what was left behind.
  9. Pet Loss: The death or loss of a beloved pet can be deeply painful and elicit grief, as pets often become part of the family.
  10. Natural Disasters: Survivors of natural disasters, such as hurricanes, earthquakes, or wildfires, may experience grief for the loss of their homes, and belongings, and a sense of security.
  11. Loss of Independence: As individuals age or experience a disability or illness, the loss of independence and the ability to perform everyday tasks can lead to feelings of grief.
  12. Cultural or Community Changes: Changes in cultural traditions, societal norms, or community structures can evoke a sense of grief and loss.
  13. Loss of a Sibling: Losing a sibling, whether due to illness, accident, or other circumstances, can be a source of profound grief.
  14. Financial Loss: Experiencing significant financial setbacks, such as bankruptcy or the loss of investments, can lead to grief over the loss of financial security and stability.
  15. Loss of a Mentor or Role Model: Losing a mentor, coach, or someone you looked up to can evoke feelings of grief, especially if that person played a significant role in your life.
  16. Child Leaving for College or Moving Out: When children grow up and leave the family home, parents may experience grief over the change in their family dynamic.
  17. Loss of a Possession: Sentimental attachment to an object can result in grief when that object is lost, stolen, or destroyed.
  18. National or Global Tragedies: Events such as acts of terrorism, pandemics, or war can trigger collective grief as people mourn the loss of safety, security, or loved ones.

Grief is a highly individualized experience, and people may respond differently to various forms of loss. It’s essential to recognize and validate one’s feelings of grief and seek support when needed to navigate the mourning process effectively.

It’s essential to reach out for professional help and support from loved ones. Avoiding these harmful behaviors can contribute to your overall well-being as you work toward recovery.

Depression is a complex mental health condition that can manifest in various ways. It’s important to note that not everyone with depression will experience all of these symptoms, and the severity and duration of symptoms can vary from person to person.

Here is a list of common symptoms of depression:

  1. Persistent Sadness: Feeling sad, empty, or hopeless most of the day, nearly every day.
  2. Loss of Interest or Pleasure: A marked decrease in interest or pleasure in activities that were once enjoyed, including hobbies, social interactions, and passions.
  3. Fatigue and Low Energy: A constant feeling of fatigue and low energy, even after adequate rest or sleep.
  4. Changes in Appetite or Weight: Significant changes in appetite, leading to weight gain or loss. This can manifest as overeating or a lack of interest in food.
  5. Sleep Disturbances: Difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep, or experiencing excessive sleep (hypersomnia).
  6. Irritability or Agitation: Feeling easily irritable, restless, or having a short temper, even over minor issues.
  7. Difficulty Concentrating: Trouble concentrating, making decisions, or remembering things, often referred to as “brain fog.”
  8. Feelings of Worthlessness or Guilt: Persistent feelings of worthlessness, self-blame, or guilt, even when there is no rational basis for these emotions.
  9. Physical Symptoms: Unexplained physical symptoms such as headaches, stomachaches, or other pain that don’t respond well to treatment.
  10. Social Withdrawal: Avoiding social interactions, isolating oneself from friends and loved ones, and a general withdrawal from normal activities.
  11. Negative Self-Talk: Frequent negative thoughts about oneself, life, and the future, often characterized by self-criticism and pessimism.
  12. Suicidal Thoughts: Thoughts of death or suicide, or making plans or attempts to harm oneself. If you or someone you know is experiencing suicidal thoughts, seek help immediately.
  13. Loss of Libido: Decreased interest in sex or intimacy.
  14. Physical Sluggishness: Feeling physically slowed down, as if your body is heavy or difficult to move.
  15. Lack of Motivation: A pervasive lack of motivation to accomplish daily tasks or pursue goals.
  16. Changes in Patterns of Speech: Slowed speech, speaking less, or speaking with a sense of hopelessness.
  17. Unexplained Aches and Pains: Complaining of physical symptoms, such as joint pain or muscle aches, without a clear medical cause.
  18. Frequent Crying: Frequent episodes of crying or feeling overwhelmed by sadness.

Seeking help from a mental health professional is a critical step toward recovery. If you or someone you know is experiencing these symptoms, don’t hesitate to reach out to a therapist, counselor, psychiatrist, or a trusted healthcare provider for assessment and support. Depression is not a sign of weakness, and with the right treatment, many people can manage their symptoms and regain a fulfilling life.

Conclusion

Overcoming depression is a journey that requires time, effort, and patience. While there is no one-size-fits-all solution, the strategies outlined in this comprehensive guide can provide you with a solid foundation for managing depression and regaining your mental well-being. Remember that you are not alone in this struggle, and seeking help from professionals and loved ones can make a significant difference in your path to recovery.

Further Reading

https://disabledentrepreneur.uk/how-to-deal-with-grief/

https://disabledentrepreneur.uk/useful-links-2/

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Battling Demons: Alcoholism Among Veterans

Battling Demons: Alcoholism Among Veterans

Alcoholism is a widespread and devastating problem that affects people from all walks of life. However, one group that is particularly vulnerable to this issue is military veterans. The challenges faced during and after military service can lead some veterans down a path of alcohol dependence, creating a complex and pressing issue that deserves attention and understanding.

The Silent Struggle

The life of a military veteran is marked by unique experiences and challenges, including combat deployments, extended periods of separation from loved ones, and the stress of adapting to civilian life. These experiences can take a heavy toll on a veteran’s mental and emotional well-being. As a result, many veterans turn to alcohol as a means of coping with their trauma, anxiety, and depression.

1. Trauma and PTSD: Exposure to traumatic events during active service can lead to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in veterans. The symptoms of PTSD, including intrusive memories, flashbacks, and emotional numbing, often drive individuals to seek solace in alcohol. They may use alcohol to self-medicate and temporarily escape from the haunting memories of their service.

2. Transition to Civilian Life: Reintegrating into civilian life can be challenging for veterans. They may struggle to find employment, establish a sense of purpose, or build a support network. The isolation and lack of structure that sometimes accompany civilian life can increase the risk of alcohol abuse.

3. Comorbid Mental Health Issues: Many veterans face mental health issues such as depression, anxiety, and substance use disorders in addition to PTSD. Alcohol is often used as a way to alleviate these co-occurring conditions, even though it ultimately exacerbates them.

The Consequences

Alcoholism among veterans has far-reaching consequences, not only for the individuals affected but also for their families, communities, and society as a whole. Some of the consequences include:

1. Health Problems: Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to a range of physical health issues, including liver disease, heart problems, and an increased risk of accidents and injuries.

2. Relationship Strain: Alcoholism can strain relationships with loved ones, leading to marital problems, family conflicts, and social isolation.

3. Employment Issues: Veterans struggling with alcoholism may have difficulty maintaining steady employment, which can further exacerbate their financial and mental health challenges.

4. Legal Problems: Drunk driving, public intoxication, and other alcohol-related offenses can lead to legal problems and involvement with the criminal justice system.

5. Suicidal Ideation: Veterans with alcoholism are at a higher risk of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. The combination of alcohol abuse and untreated mental health issues can be particularly lethal.

Seeking Help and Support

Recognizing the problem and seeking help is the first step towards recovery. Fortunately, there are numerous resources available to veterans struggling with alcoholism:

1. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA): The VA offers a range of mental health and substance abuse services for veterans. These services include counseling, therapy, and inpatient treatment programs. Office for Veterans’ Affairs – GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

2. Support Groups: Veterans can benefit from joining support groups like Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) or groups specifically tailored to veterans dealing with substance abuse issues.

3. Community-Based Programs: Many communities have programs and resources dedicated to helping veterans with substance abuse problems. These may include counseling services, vocational training, and housing assistance.

4. Veteran Service Organizations: Organizations like the American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) often have resources and support networks for veterans struggling with alcoholism.

5. Professional Treatment: In some cases, professional treatment at rehabilitation centers may be necessary to address severe alcohol dependence.

Ways To Help Veterans With Mental Health & Alcoholism

Supporting veterans with mental health challenges and alcoholism is a vital and compassionate endeavor. These individuals have sacrificed much for their country, and we must help them on their path to recovery and healing. Here are some ways to assist veterans facing these issues:

  1. Promote Awareness and Reduce Stigma: Foster an environment where open discussions about mental health and addiction are encouraged and stigma is reduced. This encourages veterans to seek help without fear of judgment.
  2. Educate the Community: Conduct community workshops, seminars, and events to educate the public about the challenges veterans face, including mental health issues and alcoholism. Promote understanding and empathy.
  3. Support Veteran Service Organizations: Volunteer with or donate to organizations such as the American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW), or Disabled American Veterans (DAV). These organizations often provide essential support to veterans.
  4. Offer a Listening Ear: Sometimes, veterans just need someone to talk to. Be available to listen without judgment when they want to share their thoughts and experiences.
  5. Encourage Professional Help: Encourage veterans to seek professional help from mental health providers and addiction specialists. Provide information on available resources and assist with scheduling appointments.
  6. Foster a Supportive Network: Create a network of friends and family who can provide emotional support. Having a strong support system can make a significant difference in a veteran’s recovery journey.
  7. Supportive Housing Programs: Support initiatives that provide stable housing for veterans. Stable housing can be a crucial factor in their recovery from alcoholism and mental health issues.
  8. Employment Assistance: Assist veterans in finding meaningful employment. Stable employment can provide structure and purpose in their lives, reducing the risk of relapse.
  9. Encourage Healthy Activities: Promote physical fitness and healthy lifestyle choices. Regular exercise and a balanced diet, taking up a hobby, can have a positive impact on mental health and addiction recovery.
  10. Veteran Peer Support Groups: Connect veterans with peer support groups where they can share experiences and coping strategies with others who have faced similar challenges.
  11. Access to VA Services: Help veterans navigate the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) system to access mental health services, addiction treatment, and other benefits they may be entitled to.
  12. Awareness of Triggers: Be aware of potential triggers for their alcoholism or mental health issues and help them avoid or cope with these triggers. This might include avoiding certain places or situations.
  13. Family Counseling: Encourage family counseling and therapy to help families understand and support their veteran loved ones effectively.
  14. Emergency Contacts: Make sure veterans have access to emergency contacts, including crisis hotlines and local mental health crisis centers.
  15. Advocate for Policy Changes: Advocate for policies that improve access to mental health and addiction treatment for veterans, as well as policies that address the unique challenges they face in transitioning to civilian life.
  16. Stay Informed: Stay informed about the latest developments in the field of mental health and addiction treatment to provide veterans with the most up-to-date information and resources. Veterans And Substance Abuse: Scope, Risks, And Treatment – Addiction Resource

Remember that each veteran’s journey is unique, and the level of support they need may vary. Being patient, empathetic, and persistent in offering help can make a significant difference in the lives of veterans struggling with mental health and alcoholism.

Further Reading

Alcoholism Symptoms And Warning Signs – Addiction Center

Conclusion

Alcoholism among veterans is a complex and multifaceted issue rooted in the unique challenges they face during and after military service. Society must recognize the struggles of veterans and offer them the support and understanding they need to overcome alcoholism. By providing access to mental health services, addiction treatment, and a strong support system, we can help veterans on their journey to recovery and healing. The road may be difficult, but with the right resources and support, veterans can regain control of their lives and find hope for a brighter future.

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Can being patronizing and condescending affect mental health?

Can being patronizing and condescending affect mental health?

Patronizing and condescending behavior can have a significant impact on an individual’s mental health. These behaviors can cause feelings of frustration, anger, and low self-esteem, which can lead to more severe mental health issues over time.

When an individual feels patronized or condescended to by others, they may experience feelings of worthlessness, shame, and inadequacy. These feelings can lead to a negative self-image, causing a decline in self-esteem, and, in severe cases, depression and anxiety.

Being patronized and talked down can also lead to feelings of powerlessness and helplessness. This can cause a person to feel as though they have no control over their situation, leading to an increased likelihood of developing depression or anxiety.

Condescending behavior can also impact one’s relationships. When a person is repeatedly patronized or talked down to, they may begin to avoid certain people or situations to avoid these interactions. This can lead to social isolation and, over time, impact one’s mental health negatively.

Furthermore, constant condescending behavior can lead to a negative outlook on life. A person who is repeatedly told they are not good enough or smart enough may begin to believe these statements, leading to a lack of motivation and self-doubt.

In some cases, patronizing and condescending behavior can also lead to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This is particularly true when the behavior is chronic and occurs over an extended period. People who experience constant patronization and condescension may become hyper-vigilant or feel threatened even in innocuous situations, leading to symptoms associated with PTSD.

Patronizing and Condescending behavior can have a significant impact on an individual’s mental health. It can lead to feelings of worthlessness, low self-esteem, anxiety, depression, social isolation, and even post-traumatic stress disorder. Therefore, it is essential to recognize these behaviors and take steps to address them to maintain good mental health. If you are experiencing patronizing or condescending behavior, it is vital to seek support from loved ones or a mental health professional to help you deal with the situation effectively.

What is the definition of patronization?

Patronization is a term that refers to the act of treating someone in a condescending or superior manner, often with the intention of demonstrating one’s own perceived superiority or authority over them. It can manifest in a variety of ways, from the use of patronizing language to making decisions for someone without their input or consent.

The act of patronizing someone can be damaging, as it can convey a message of disrespect and undermine the person’s sense of autonomy and self-worth. When someone is patronized, they may feel belittled, dismissed, or disrespected, which can lead to feelings of frustration, anger, and resentment.

One of the most common forms of patronization is the use of language. For example, speaking to someone in a baby voice, using pet names, or excessively using simplifications or clarifications, can all be forms of patronization. This type of language suggests that the person being spoken to is not intelligent or capable enough to understand complex ideas, which can be insulting and offensive.

Another common form of patronization is when someone makes decisions for another person without their input or consent. This can happen in personal or professional contexts, such as when a boss makes decisions for an employee without considering their opinion, or when a family member assumes they know what is best for someone else without taking their wishes into account. This type of behavior can be particularly damaging as it can take away a person’s agency and leave them feeling powerless.

Patronization can also be unintentional, and some people may not even realize they are doing it. For example, someone may offer unsolicited advice or try to help in a situation where their assistance is not needed, with the intention of being helpful, but the person on the receiving end may still feel patronized.

To avoid patronizing others, it is important to be aware of one’s own language and actions. This means speaking to others in a respectful and considerate manner, listening to their opinions and preferences, and avoiding making decisions for them without their input or consent. It is also important to recognize the inherent value and worth of each person, regardless of their background or level of experience.

A patronization is a form of behavior that can be harmful to individuals and can lead to feelings of frustration, anger, and resentment. To avoid patronizing others, it is important to be aware of one’s own language and actions and to treat others with respect and consideration. By doing so, we can create a more supportive and inclusive environment where everyone feels valued and respected.

What is the definition of condescending?

Condescending is a term used to describe a person’s behavior or tone when they speak down to others or display a sense of superiority or disdain. It is a negative trait that can make people feel belittled, demeaned, or devalued.

A condescending person may use language that is patronizing or dismissive, or they may act as if they know more than others and are not interested in hearing other people’s ideas or opinions. This behavior is often rooted in a belief that they are smarter, more knowledgeable, or more important than others.

For example, a condescending person may speak slowly and use simple words when talking to someone they perceive as less intelligent or less educated than themselves. They may also interrupt or talk over others, dismiss their ideas, or ignore their contributions to a conversation.

Condescending behavior can occur in a variety of settings, including the workplace, social situations, and personal relationships. It can be exhibited by people of any age, gender, or cultural background.

In the workplace, condescending behavior can be particularly damaging to morale and productivity. Employees who feel belittled or undervalued may become disengaged and less motivated to contribute to the team’s goals. It can also lead to increased tension and conflict among colleagues.

In personal relationships, condescending behavior can be a sign of a power imbalance or a lack of respect. It can damage the trust and intimacy between partners, friends, or family members and make it difficult to maintain healthy relationships.

To avoid being condescending, it is important to recognize and respect the opinions and contributions of others, even if they differ from your own. It is also important to communicate in a clear and respectful manner, without talking down to others or using language that is patronizing or dismissive.

Condescending behavior is a negative trait that can damage relationships and undermine productivity. By recognizing and avoiding condescending behavior, we can build more positive and respectful interactions with others.

Is showing pity deemed as condescending

Showing pity can be deemed as condescending if it is done in a way that makes the person receiving the pity feel inferior or powerless. Pity is often associated with a sense of superiority or a belief that the person being pitied is unable to cope with their situation. This can be insulting and demeaning to the person on the receiving end of the pity.

However, showing empathy or compassion towards someone who is going through a difficult time can be helpful and supportive. The key is to approach the situation with genuine concern and respect for the other person’s feelings and dignity, rather than from a position of superiority or judgment. By demonstrating kindness and understanding, you can create a more positive and uplifting environment for everyone involved.

List of patronizing and condescending comments

  1. Oh, bless your heart, you’re trying your best.”
  2. “That’s adorable, you almost got it right.”
  3. “Don’t worry, sweetie, it’s a bit too complicated for you.”
  4. “Let me explain this to you in simple terms.”
  5. “You’re so cute when you’re clueless.”
  6. “I’ll handle this, you wouldn’t understand.”
  7. “You should be proud of yourself for trying, even if you failed.”
  8. “I’ll give you a gold star for effort.”
  9. “You’re doing a great job, for someone with your limited abilities.”
  10. “Let me do this for you, it’s too hard for you to figure out.”

Editors Notes.

Today I phoned the local council office about my rent increase to clarify if, on the Government website, there is a rent cap, but no one seems to be able to give me a definitive answer. My landlord is increasing my rent by £210 per month and from what I can see on the Gov website the most he can charge is £165.00

Rent Cap Gov Screenshot https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/rent-standard/limit-on-annual-rent-increases-2022-23-from-april-2022

Limit on annual rent increases 2022-23 (from April 2022) – GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

The agent I spoke to said: “Oh Bless” when I explained about my disabilities. If it was anyone else I would have given them a piece of my mind but because you have to watch what you say with these people, I bit my tongue. After the call had ended I felt so upset because I was perceived to be inferior and pitied. I felt worthless and tried to erase the words from my head so that I did not spiral down the rabbit hole. Just because I have a disability does not make me less human.

People need to watch what they say to other people. I found the agent I spoke to today to be condescending and I still feel like crying even now.

I am fortunate I can vent my frustrations out on this platform as a self-help therapy tool. I know that even if I do not have anyone to talk to about my health, I know someone will read this and relate.

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PTSD – Post Traumatic Stress Disorder – Personal Story.

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PTSD – Post Traumatic Stress Disorder – Personal Story.

Over the years I have endured many traumatic events, including domestic violence, the death of close family members, a car accident, and other life-changing incidents.

I have written articles about grief and how I have coped over the years plus I have cited source information on proven ways to help with, depression, anxiety, and stress disorders.

I have moments that trigger memories of past events like the time a criminal investigation officer (CID in 2011) walked into my property with another officer without knocking, being threatening, and taking my 10 yr old daughter into the kitchen, by himself to get her version of events, whilst I had the other officer talking to me in the living room because I would not press charges against the person that assaulted me. I ended up reporting him to the Police Ombudsman and he was demoted as a consequence.

So for anyone that comes into my property unannounced I start to get panic attacks and feel nauseous (28/11/22).

People who do not know my history and have not walked in my shoes have not got a clue what I have gone through, hence I plan to write my autobiography in order for the world to know so that people stop judging me.

Yes, I get judged because of my disabilities but it is because of the trauma that I have endured is why I have the disabilities.

I suffer from cerebellar atrophy, (head trauma). I also suffer from anxiety, panic attacks, and intrusive thoughts. I have a bad knee from it being kicked seven times until it dislocated.

My therapy is to motivate and empower myself and learn about the mind. I am studying for a diploma in neuroplasticity and psychotherapy. I do not plan to change my career path, I just want to understand more about how the brain works and how I can re-wire my mind. This is just a personal goal.

I must admit I was shaken up today when I saw someone on the stairs but have got gradually over it by keeping myself busy as the day has progressed.

I tend to do a lot of research and writing so what happened a few hours ago is now in the past, although it was an unpleasant experience, which triggered my past memories, thus prompting me to write this article.

In hindsight, I should lock my flat door when I am inside but there is an outer door that a visitor must come through before opening my door. I am curious what would have happened if I was not home because obviously this entity must have had keys to get in or the flat below me let them in. However, if I was not home they would have needed keys to enter my flat.

There should be a law that no one should enter the property without the tenant being present because what is to say that a contractor does not help themselves to valuables? You would have no proof they stole anything unless you had CCTV installed”. Yes, I may be accused of being distrusting, but over my lifetime I have been very trusting and people have abused my trust.

Overview – Post-traumatic stress disorder

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder caused by very stressful, frightening, or distressing past events.

Symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Someone with PTSD often relives the traumatic event through nightmares and flashbacks and may experience feelings of isolation, social disconnection, irritability, anger, and guilt. People often have trouble sleeping, such as insomnia, and find concentrating difficult. These symptoms are often severe and persistent enough to have a significant impact on the person’s day-to-day life.

Changes in Physical and Emotional Reactions

Patients are characterized by having:

  • Anger issues, short tempers, jumpiness, and irritability
  • Zero tolerance
  • Short attention span, with no patience
  • Paranoia
  • Panic attacks
  • High blood pressure or hyperventilation
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Muscle tension
  • Nausea or diarrhea

Cognitive and mood symptoms

  • The negative outlook on life, yourself, and others
  • Loss of hope for the future
  • Lapses in memory about the traumatic experience
  • Self-blame and guilt
  • Losing interest in previously enjoyable activities
  • Detachment from family members

For a PTSD diagnosis, a person must experience one or more re-experiencing symptoms and one or more avoidance symptoms. Also, they will need to display two or more changes in physical and emotional reactions and two or more cognitive and mood symptoms.

Risk and Resilience Factors

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, mental health disorders such as depression, anxiety, stress, and substance abuse often accompany post-traumatic stress disorder. Additionally, there are risk factors that can increase the likelihood of experiencing symptoms of PTSD, such as:

  • Genetics
  • Childhood trauma
  • A history of alcohol and drug abuse
  • No support system or social interaction following traumatic events
  • Experiencing prolonged trauma
  • High levels of stress in everyday life
  • Mental illness in oneself or relatives
  • Careers that have a high risk of exposure to a traumatic event, for example, military servicemembers or first responders
  • Gender: women are more likely to experience certain symptoms of PTSD
  • A domino effect of consequences, such as grief from separation from a partner, not having anyone to turn to, and losing a job, following a traumatic experience

Resilience factors that reduce the risk of having PTSD following traumatic events include:

  • Having a support group
  • Seeking out therapy
  • Keeping busy
  • Having healthy personal relationships
  • Being able to control reactions related to fear and anger
  • Early intervention and PTS treatment, before it develops into a disorder
  • Having social and emotional support from an early age
  • Having positive coping mechanisms

Causes of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Any situation that a person finds traumatic can cause PTSD.

These can include:

  • the sudden death of a loved one
  • a breakup with a partner
  • serious road accidents
  • domestic violence, such as sexual assault, rape, mugging or robbery
  • serious health problems
  • childbirth experiences, miscarriages

PTSD can develop immediately after someone experiences a disturbing event. Sufferers of trauma may have symptoms of PTSD for many months or years.

PTSD is estimated to affect about 1 in every 3 people who have a traumatic experience, but it’s not clear exactly why some people develop the condition and others do not.

Complex post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

People who experience multiple traumatic events in the course of their lifetime from situations such as severe neglect, abuse, or violence, may be diagnosed with complex PTSD. Complex PTSD can cause similar symptoms to PTSD and may not develop until years after the event. It’s often more severe if the trauma was experienced early in life, as this can affect a child’s development.

When to get medical advice

After you have experienced trauma you may feel life unbearable and very overwhelmed with the feeling the whole world is crashing down around you. You must seek professional help as quickly as possible to try and get your mental health under control. It’s normal to be very upset and confused.

The best thing you can do other than to see your doctor is to distract yourself and make yourself busy. Distractions could include, art therapy, going for a walk, meeting people, reading, and learning a new skill. Join support groups online if you feel you cannot interact physically.

You should speak with your GP first who can refer you to mental health specialists and advice you on all your different options for getting therapy.

I have in my time gone to psychiatrists and have also done CBT therapy but for me personally learning how to block out intrusive thoughts through accredited courses helps me to become an expert on how my mind works and what I can do to get better.

Learning is not for everyone, but as long as you write your thoughts down and release them to the universe you are one step closer to recovery.

How post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is treated

PTSD in many cases can be treated, even when it develops many years after a traumatic event.

A person suffering from anxiety and depression has to want to recover. It cannot be forced. It is a gradual process and it takes time. A person needs to take small steps, a day at a time.

Food for thought -This is more so for people who have done your wrong, abused, and hurt you. If you are a believer in God you may want to get the quote from Mathew 6 in the Bible that is to forgive the person that has done you wrong, thus God will forgive your sins and will take care of the rest. Who is more powerful than you to take revenge on the person that has hurt you, God of course…

Any of the following treatment options may be recommended:

  • watchful waiting – monitoring your symptoms to see whether they improve or get worse without treatment
  • antidepressants – such as paroxetine or sertraline
  • psychological therapies – such as trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR)

Final Thoughts From The Editor

Do check out our useful links page and if you are suffering from depression please visit: 24/7 Depression Hotline | NationalDepressionHotline.org

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